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Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program

Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program

Countering the loss of ecological function and biological diversity that jeopardize the health of Ohio's water resources.

Water resources are among Ohio's most valuable assets; while significant progress has been made to maintain and improve these resources, habitat degradation, hydromodification, and siltation continue to impair overall water quality.

The goal of the WRRSP is to counter the loss of ecological function and biological diversity that jeopardize the health of Ohio's water resources. To achieve this goal, the WRRSP provides funding for projects that specifically target the protection and restoration of high-quality streams and wetlands.

To qualify for WRRSP funding, projects must result in the full protection and/or restoration of targeted aquatic resource; streams must either be in attainment of, or fully restored to, warmwater habitat or higher aquatic life use under Ohio Water Quality Standards, and wetlands must achieve or be fully restored to Ohio Rapid Assessment Method Category 3 status.

What's New

Program Updates

  • The 2022 Final Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) Program Management Plan (PMP) is available, along with the Director's Cover Letter. The Final WPCLF PMP includes the list of Proposed intended Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program Projects.
  • WRRSP Staff are returning to the office beginning April 25, 2022 and are authorized for field visits. The best way to reach us is still by e-mail or by asking a question through the customer support center's ask a question form.
  • WRRSP Staff will continue to conduct meetings via Teams. Pre-nomination meetings will either be conducted via Teams or in the field. Prior to pre-nominations meetings, implementers must submit a Pre-Nomination Site Review Request Form for projects to be considered for funding.
Schedule of Deliverables for Upcoming Nominations
By July 15th Complete your project's WRRSP Pre-Nomination Site Review Request Form and submit it to Mike Kelly.
By August 15th Complete your project's water resources assessments.
August 1- 15th Submit your WRRSP project nominations for the upcoming WPCLF Program Year.
October The WPCLF Program Management Plan is issued draft - this includes the list of Proposed fundable WRRSP projects.
December The WPCLF Program Management Plan is issued final - the PMP includes the list of Intended WRRSP projects for the Fast-Track one-year cycle and the Standard two-year cycle.

New Documents and Publications

FAQs

Frequently Asked Questions

WRRSP Eligibility and Funding Process

Administered by Ohio EPA's Division of Environmental and Financial Assistance, the WPCLF provides below-market financing to Ohio communities for the planning, design and construction of wastewater treatment facilities. Within the WPCLF, the WRRSP is a specialized sponsorship program, as opposed to a traditional grant program, whereby funding is generated by individual WPCLF loans sponsoring WRRSP protection and/or restoration projects. Key stakeholders in the WRRSP program include implementers and sponsors of wastewater infrastructure projects.

Eligible Activities

To be eligible for WRRSP funding:

  • Project and costs must be directly related to restoring and/or protecting a site's aquatic life use. Eligible projects include stream and wetland protection through fee-simple property acquisition, and stream and wetland restoration that corrects impairments to on-site aquatic resources.
  • Project must either by itself, or in concert with other past, present or future projects, result in the full protection or restoration of the aquatic resource. Streams must either be in attainment of, or be fully restored to, at least Warmwater Habitat or greater designated aquatic life use under Ohio Water Quality Standards. Wetlands must achieve, or be restored to, a Category 3 designation. Performance criteria include both habitat and biological assessment methods.
  • At a minimum, a project nomination must include habitat assessments on the highest quality water resource (preferably resources, if there are more than one). Biological assessments are not currently required as part of a project nomination; however, because habitat assessments only indicate whether suitable habitat is present to support aquatic life uses while biological assessments represent actual attainment status, projects that include biological assessments will be favored over those that include only habitat assessments. The WRRSP will continue to evaluate the need to require biological assessment data.

Implementers will be limited to no more than five open WRRSP projects at the time nominations are submitted. And all required annual reports for previous projects awarded to the implementer must have been submitted to DEFA in order to be considered for funding for any additional projects.

Ineligible Activities

Projects such as trails, boardwalks, excessive upland recreational facilities and other structures, parking areas, equipment, projects that don't meet water quality goals, required mitigation projects, appraisals, and in-house implementer costs are not eligible for WRRSP funding. Projects with encumbrances detrimental to the conservation values of the project, or other issues that may impede readiness-to-proceed may not be funded. Additionally, acquisition and/or restoration of parcels with perpetual leases or severed mineral rights, regardless of when the severance took place, will not be eligible for WRRSP funding.

Requests for Site Alterations After Your Project Management Plan is Approved

Implementers shall not construct trails, parking lots, shelters, restroom facilities, or similar without first submitting a plan for their proposed location, construction and maintenance to DEFA-WRRSP project reviewers, and receiving their prior approval.

Project Selection

Typically, up to $15 million is provided annually for WRRSP projects through a highly competitive nomination and award process. Nominations are accepted each year and project scoring is based on several criteria, including:

  • importance of the resource;
  • restoration potential, and;
  • overall effectiveness of the proposed project action.

Once scored and ranked, fundable projects are identified in DEFA's WPCLF Program Management Plan that is issued prior to the start of the WPCLF program year.

Implementers

Who can be an implementer?

Entities that implement WRRSP projects may include non-profit conservation organizations, park districts, political sub-divisions and even WPCLF loan recipients. Implementers partner with sponsors during the appropriate program year and, in anticipation of the revenue stream that would have been generated by the sponsoring WPCLF loan, DEFA advances a portion of this funding for the WRRSP project.

Project Schedules

  • For most projects, the WRRSP operates on a two-year cycle. During the first year, Implementers work toward a final management plan and environmental covenant, identifying a Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) sponsor and obtaining a Letter of Intent from that sponsor, and identifying the project delivery method (design-bid-build or design-build). Projects using the traditional design-bid-built method must prepare details plans for review in year 1. Projects using the design-build method must develop a detailed Request for Qualifications (RFQ) and/or Request for Proposal (RFP) during year 1. Only when these activities have been successfully completed may a project be funded during year 2 and at the same time the sponsoring WPCLF loan is awarded.
  • Recognizing the need to sometimes provide funding quicker, DEFA now offers a 1-year cycle for protection projects that meet "readiness-to proceed" criteria. For more information, see the important details provided below.

Schedule for projects from the 2022 Program Management Plan (PMP) intended for funding in 2023 (Standard two-year WRRSP cycle)

April 1, 2022 Draft Management Plan Due (for review and comment)
May 1, 2022 Full Appraisal Report Due (if not previously submitted)
June 1, 2022 Draft Environmental Covenant Due (including exhibits: Exhibit A includes the legal description of the property and Exhibit B includes the map and any encumbrances)
Oct. 31, 2022 - Approvable Final Management Plan Due
- Draft Request for Proposals (design-build projects)
- Draft detailed designs including detail plans and specifications (60% for design-bid-build projects)
- Mutually agreed upon final Environmental Covenant
Dec. 29, 2022 Letter of Intent Due.
Jan. 1 - Dec. 31, 2023 Funding for projects will be available after the sponsoring WPCLF project's loan has been awarded in tandem with the WRRSP project.

Project Timelines

Summary of WRRSP Project Timeline (2-Year Cycle)

Submit Pre-nomination Site Review Request By July 15 Submit Pre-nomination Site Review Request Form, then conduct conference call or video call or site visit to discuss the project before submitting a WRRSP project nomination form.
Submit Project Nominations August 1-15 Submit WRRSP Project Nomination form to DEFA.
Scoring and Ranking Aug. 15 - Oct. 1 Nominated projects are evaluated for eligibility, then scored and ranked by WRRSP staff.
Placement on the Project Priority List Draft October 31
Final December 31
Projects that score within fundable range are listed on the Intended Projects List in the annual Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) Program Management Plan (PMP).
Year One   Implementers work with WRRSP staff to complete program milestones including the development of a Management Plan and an Environmental Covenant.
Year Two   Funding for projects will be available after the sponsoring WPCLF loan has been awarded in tandem with the WRRSP project

 

Summary of WRRSP Project Timeline (1-Year Cycle)

One-year cycle "fast-track" projects are preservation projects that can demonstrate, during the nomination period, that they meet all program requirements
Submit Pre-nomination Site Review Request By July 15 Submit Pre-nomination Site Review Request Form, then conduct conference call, video call or site visit to discuss the project before submitting a WRRSP project nomination form.
Submit Project Nominations August 1- 15 Submit WRRSP Project Nomination form to DEFA.
The nomination must include:
  • justification for an early award
  • a draft Management Plan
  • a "clean" title search (i.e. no encumbrance or ownership issues)
  • a draft Environmental Covenant,
  • an executed purchase agreement, and
  • a full appraisal report.
Scoring and Ranking Aug. 15 - Oct. 30 Nominated projects are evaluated for eligibility, then scored and ranked by WRRSP staff. A one-year funding award is not guaranteed: All required documents must be reviewed and approved by WRRSP staff, before the WPCLF Program Management Plan is made final for the upcoming program year.
Placement on the Project Priority List Draft October 31
Final December 31
Projects that score within fundable range are listed on the Intended Projects List in the WPCLF PMP.
Year One   All program requirements will be finalized. Funding for the WRRSP one-year cycle projects will be available after the sponsoring WPCLF loan has been awarded in tandem with the WRRSP project.

Pre-nomination Meeting

Prior to submitting your project nomination, it is mandatory that you submit a Pre-Nomination Site Review Request Form. WRRSP staff will conduct a desktop review of the site based on the form. Upon completion of our desktop review, we will coordinate a conference, video conference call or site visit to discuss the project. To allow for the most productive discussion, provide high quality maps, exhibits, photos and data forms. Use one Pre-nomination form for each project. Keep in mind that corridor projects involving multiple non-adjacent parcels may need multiple Pre-nomination Forms.

The mandatory submittal of a Pre-Nomination Site Review Request Form is necessary only for any new sites not previously visited by WRRSP staff or when a project is being revised from a previous site visit or nomination.

Nominating a Project

Each year, Ohio EPA invites entities with potential WRRSP projects to nominate them for inclusion in either the fast-track or two-year funding cycle. Complete WRRSP nomination forms will be accepted during the current year's nomination period for the following Program Year. Projects are then scored, ranked and placed on the Intended Projects List in the WPCLF Program Management Plan (PMP). Please review the FAQs tab for eligibility information.

Baseline habitat assessments for existing aquatic resources, including the Ohio Rapid Assessment Method (ORAM) for wetlands and Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index (QHEI) or Headwater Habitat Evaluation Index (HHEI) for streams, must be submitted in the nomination form. Projects with both habitat and biological assessments will be given priority over those based only on habitat assessments. For restoration projects, both habitat and bioassessment pre- and post-restoration target scores are required.

Environmental Covenants

All WRRSP projects require the placement of an Environmental Covenant (EC) on any and all acreage acquired with WRRSP funds. The EC includes use restrictions for the purpose of upholding the site's conservation values, in perpetuity. Parties to the covenant include the property owner, holder and Ohio EPA.

Finding A Sponsor

Since WRRSP projects involve an interest rate discount for the Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) sponsoring loan recipient, implementers are solely responsible for contacting potential sponsors. Sponsoring projects must be scheduled for award in the appropriate program year and generate enough interest to cover the cost of the WRRSP project. Implementers may identify potential sponsors by reviewing the draft and final Intended Projects List (IPL) within the annual WPCLF Program Management Plan. Note that a WRRSP project may have multiple WPCLF sponsors and/or sponsoring loans.

Disbursement Requests

The budget for each WRRSP project is included in the WPCLF PMP and in each project's approved Management Plan. The final project costs and total requested disbursement amount cannot exceed what was approved.

The WRRSP is a reimbursement program; therefore, project funds are available once the sponsoring loan package has been approved. Project costs submitted for reimbursement/disbursement must be directly related to the scope of the project and attainment of the project's water quality goals.

The Ohio Water Development Authority (OWDA) acts as the financial manager for the WRRSP and WPCLF programs.

The WRRSP is developing a new disbursement request guidance document which will:

  • Provide a step-by-step process to complete a WRRSP disbursement request.
  • Provide instructions to complete the OWDA disbursement request form
  • Explain what to include in the disbursement request package including:
    • Contractor payment instructions
    • Schedule of values
    • Invoices
    • Detailed summary of work completed during request period, etc.
  • Explain the process for the sponsor and WRRSP staff to approve the request and
  • Provide a timeframe for the approval process and transfer of approved funds.

Monitoring

Project monitoring is necessary to determine whether the site's conservation values have been met/upheld. The Sponsor and the Implementer agree that the perpetual protection and maintenance of the WRRSP Project shall be carried out in accordance with the restrictions and responsibilities identified in the Management Plan and the Environmental Covenant.

Annual Reporting

For all projects, an annual report shall be submitted to DEFA after the Environmental Covenant (EC) recording. The annual report must document project monitoring; any changes on the property or with the project; amount of acreage restored or protected, including acreages of various habitat types; and progress of any on-going work.

Submit annual reports to us via e-mail.

To submit large files, please use Ohio EPA’s file sharing website.

Follow these instructions to create an account or login using your existing account.

Implementer Documents

Additional documents are available on the Resources tab.

Sponsors

Who can be a sponsor?

Any Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) loan recipient may voluntarily agree to sponsor a WRRSP project as part of their loan by entering into a formal sponsorship agreement with the WRRSP project implementer. In return, the sponsor receives an interest rate discount of up to .1% on their WPCLF loan and assumes indirect oversight responsibility of WRRSP project implementation.

Finding an Implementer/WRRSP Project

Potential sponsors may contact the WRRSP team members to see what projects may be available to sponsor.

Sponsor Responsibilities

The sponsor and implementer have a common purpose of completing the WRRSP Project in accordance with the plan to protect and improve water resources within the state of Ohio.

Potential sponsors may contact the WRRSP team members to see what projects may be available to sponsor. Sponsors can also look at the final WPCLF Program Management Plan's WRRSP Intended Project list.

Sponsor Benefits

WRRSP projects involve an interest rate discount for the WPCLF sponsoring loan recipient. One or more (if needed) sponsoring projects must be scheduled for award in the appropriate program year and generate enough interest to cover the cost of the WRRSP project. Sponsors may identify potential WRRSP projects by reviewing the draft and final Intended Projects List (IPL) within the annual WPCLF PMP. Note that a WRRSP project may have multiple WPCLF sponsors and/or sponsoring loans.

Sponsor Documents

  • Letter of Intent (Word) (PDF) - A sponsor must submit a letter of intent to Ohio EPA DEFA. This letter states the sponsor's intentions to enter into a sponsorship agreement for the purpose of implementing a selected WRRSP project.
  • Resolution (Word) (PDF) - After submitting the Letter of Intent, a resolution must be passed by the governing board of the sponsoring entity and submitted to Ohio EPA DEFA in the second year of the two-year cycle in advance of the sponsoring loan award. The resolution confirms that the entity will sponsor the WRRSP project for an amount up to the amount shown on the WRRSP Intended Projects List.
  • Sponsorship Agreement (Word) (PDF) — A sponsorship agreement is passed along with the sponsoring resolution.
  • 2022 FINAL WPCLF Program Management Plan
  • 2021 FINAL WPCLF Program Management Plan

Achievements

Project Spotlights

The McCoy Fen State Nature Preserve Expansion WRRSP Project

The Cleveland Museum of Natural History, through its Natural Areas program, purchased and will permanently preserve the 73.767-acre Hostetler Tract in Wayne Township, Ashtabula County in 2021 using WRRSP funds. This property is adjacent to the Museum’s existing 208-acre McCoy Fen State Nature Preserve and expands this preserve from a 208-acre conservation area to a 282-acre conservation area.
The McCoy Fen State Nature Preserve Expansion Project is focused on preserving Category-3 wetland habitat, including fen habitat, and stream habitat. The project site contains a total of 1,700 feet of frontage on the main stem of Pymatuning Creek and 69 acres of high- quality wetlands.
Fen wetlands are extremely uncommon in Ohio. Alkaline groundwater seeps run through these wetlands supporting many rare plants. The adjacent McCoy fen has 35 state listed plant and animal species. The purchased expansion site has three state-listed species. Expanding and preserving the McCoy Fen will provide opportunity for additional state-listed plants and animals to colonize this protected site.
The Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer District sponsored this WRRSP project in connection with its Southerly Building Demolition project.


High quality wetlands adjacent to Pymatuning Creek on the property to be annexed to McCoy Fen

 

The Big Darby Creek Conservation Corridor Initiative WRRSP Project

In 2021, Appalachia Ohio Alliance (AOA) used WRRSP funds to purchase and permanently protect the 144-acre Carter property and the 144-acre Confluence property (total of 288 acres). The Carter property, in Darby and Muhlenberg townships, includes 1,785 linear feet of Big Darby Creek, which is classified as an Exceptional Warmwater Habitat stream, an Outstanding State Waters, a State Scenic River, and a part of the National Wild and Scenic River System; 3,700 linear feet of Greenbrier Creek; and 4,320 linear feet of primary headwater habitat tributaries to Greenbrier Creek and Big Darby Creek. The Confluence property is in Jackson Township and includes 3,800 linear feet of Big Darby Creek and 2,750 linear feet of the Scioto River, which is classified as a Superior State Water. Both properties are within Pickaway County and, through the project, protect critical habitat for numerous state-listed and federal-listed species. These properties are located within the Scioto River Flyway, a migratory corridor for birds, bats, butterflies, and other species. They are the ninth and tenth properties acquired by AOA within the Big Darby Creek Corridor, and in combination with other AOA projects, are protecting an estimated 7 miles of combined Scioto River and Big Darby Creek riparian corridor and frontage.

The City of Columbus sponsored this WRRSP project in connection with its Lower Olentangy Tunnel project.

AOA’s Big Darby Creek Conservation Corridor Initiative WRRSP project was sponsored by a WPCLF loan awarded to the City of Akron’s Sanitary Sewer Reconstruction 2017 project.

 

Tremper Mound and Scioto River Protection

As a long-time land conservation organization, but a first-time WRRSP implementer, the Arc of Appalachia was successful in receiving the $2.3 million funding for its high-quality Scioto River protection proposal in 2020. This impressive WRRSP project will protect, in perpetuity, 618 acres of habitat within the lower Scioto River watershed including 5,500 linear feet of Warmwater Habitat along the mainstem of the biologically diverse Scioto River, 6,500 linear feet of Exceptional Warmwater Habitat along Pond Creek, 5,500 linear feet of Class III Primary Headwater Habitat, and 12 acres of Category 3 wetlands. The project will also protect a significant archaeological site called the Tremper Mound and Works, a National Register of Historic Places (NRHP)- listed Hopewell earthwork that's approximately 2,000 years old and is the largest remaining unprotected Hopewell mound in Ohio.

Arc of Appalachia's Tremper Mound project was sponsored by a Water Pollution Control Loan Fund loan awarded to the City of Warren's Wastewater Treatment Plant and Pump Station Refurbishment

 

Secor Metropark Expansion and Wetland Restoration

As part of the on-going efforts to restore Oak Openings habitat in the former Great Black Swamp area of Northwest Ohio, the Metropolitan Park District of the Toledo Area will acquire an approximately 186-acre former golf course property that contains four acres of existing Category 3 wetlands and 2,800 linear feet of stream (Prairie Ditch) and restore 163 acres of Oak Openings Category 3 wetland communities and 12 acres of upland oak savanna habitat, all adjacent to the 610 acre Secor Metropark. Existing golf infrastructure will be removed, and the site will be regraded to restore native floodplain, topography, and hydrology. Approximately 7,000 linear feet of ditches will be plugged/removed, and vegetation will be restored to native, local plant populations. This restoration work will complement the remaining Oak Openings habitat in the region, which currently sustains more rare species of plants and animals than any other area of a similar size in Ohio.

Metropolitation Park District of the Toledo Area's Secor Metropark Expansion and Wetland Restoration project was sponsored by a Water Pollution Control Loan Fund loan awarded to the City of Akron's Water Reclamation Facility Headworks Improvements project.

Read the 2019 WRRSP Progress Report

Resources

Other Funding Opportunities

Clean Ohio Fund - Ohio Department of Development - restores, protects and connects Ohio's important natural and urban places by preserving green space and farmland, improving outdoor recreation and cleaning up brownfields to encourage redevelopment and revitalize communities.

Clean Water Act Section 319(h) Grants - Ohio EPA Division of Surface Water - targeted to Ohio waters where nonpoint source pollution is a significant cause of aquatic life use impairments. Ohio's 319 program works with watershed groups and others who are implementing locally developed watershed management plans and restoring surface waters impaired by NPS pollution.

H2Ohio - Ohio Department of Natural Resources - focused on creating, restoring or enhancing wetlands to benefit water quality.

Lake Erie Protection Fund - Ohio Lake Erie Commission - established to finance research and on-the-ground projects aimed at protecting, preserving and restoring Lake Erie and its watershed.

Documents

Resources

  • Amphibian Index of Biotic Integrity - AmphIBI - Field manual for the Amphibian Index of Biotic Integrity for Wetlands - A manual that documents the application, sampling, laboratory and data analysis procedures necessary to calculate the AmphIBI for wetlands. It is intended to standardize monitoring techniques for the use for the use of wetland biological assessments using amphibians as an indicator taxa.
  • Antidegradation provisions describe the conditions under which water quality may be lowered in surface waters. Existing beneficial uses must be maintained and protected. (See the Water Quality Standards page)
    • Antidegradation information
    • Antidegradation categories (OAC rule 3745-1-05)
    • Antidegradation provisions for wetlands - pages 529-550 - (OAC rule 3745-50 thru 54)
    • Antidegradation provisions for other surface waters of the state (OAC rule 3745-1-05)
  • Appraisers List - WRRSP property appraisers must be selected from the list of ODNR pre-qualified appraisers.
  • Aquatic Life Use Designations - found in the Ohio Administrative Code (OAC) Chapter 3745-1 Water Quality Standards. (See the Water Quality Standards page)
  • NEW HHEI manual - Field Evaluation Manual for Ohio's Primary Headwater Habitat Streams/Headwater Habitat Evaluation Index - A tool to provide standardized assessment methodologies for primary headwater habitat streams in Ohio. The manual presents methods that Ohio EPA has developed to better assess the actual and expected biological conditions in these waterways, and it outlines an acceptable methodology on how to classify primary headwater habitat streams.
  • HMFEI - Headwater Habitat Macroinvertebrate Field Evaluation Index - a rapid bio-assessment field sampling method of benthic macroinvertebrates. (located in Section 6.3.1.1 in the NEW HHEI manual)
  • HUC 12 watershed map - The U.S. Geological Survey designated 12-digit hydrologic unit codes for Ohio's 1,538 watershed assessment units (WAUs).
  • IBI - Index of Biotic Integrity - biological criteria that is incorporated into the Ohio Water Quality Standards consisting of numeric values based on fish assemblage data.
  • ICI - Invertebrate Community Index - biological criteria that is incorporated into the Ohio Water Quality Standards consisting of numeric values based on macroinvertebrate assemblage data.
  • Integrated Report - The Integrated Report indicates the general condition of Ohio's waters and identifies waters that are not meeting water quality goals. It meets both Clean Water Act 305(b) and 303(d) requirements, using a watershed assessment unit based on the 12-digit hydrologic unit.
  • Mussel Survey Protocol for Ohio - Ohio Department of Natural Resources (ODNR), Division of Wildlife and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Ohio Ecological Services Field Office regulate impacts to State and federally protected mussels and their habitats.
  • Ohio Water Development Authority - OWDA acts as the financial manager for the WRRSP and WPCLF programs.
  • ORAM V.5 Manual and ORAM 10-page form - The Ohio Rapid Assessment Method for Wetlands (ORAM) Version 5.0 - The ORAM User's Manual explains the underlying scientific rationale for the ORAM to provide detailed explanatory notes for the different sections and scores of the ORAM and to aid in the consistent use of the ORAM. The ORAM 10-page form consists of a series of questions used to properly categorize a wetland.
  • QHEI manual and forms - Methods for Assessing Habitat in Flowing Waters: Using the Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index. The manual summarizes the methodology for evaluating stream habitat.
  • QHEI manual for Lake Erie shoreline - Methods of assessing habitat in Lake Erie shoreline waters using the Qualitative Habitat Evaluation Index
  • Soil surveys - USDA - Natural Resources Conservation Service.
  • State Historic Preservation Office - Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act requires federal agencies to take into account the effects of projects on historic properties.
  • TMDL - Total Maximum Daily Load program - focuses on identifying and restoring polluted rivers, streams, lakes and other surface water bodies. Information about TMDLs and water quality monitoring are organized by large watershed.
  • VIBI - Vegetation Index of Biotic Integrity - a vegetation-based assessment tool that is used to identify indicators of wetland condition.
  • VIBI-FQ - Vegetation Index of Biotic Integrity "Floristic Quality?" - an enhancement to the existing VIBI protocols. The VIBI-FQ represents a streamlined version of the VIBI which reduces the amount of field data necessary for the assessment and also simplifies the calculation and interpretation of a final score.
  • Water Quality Standards - found in Ohio Administrative Code rule 3745-1-01, establish minimum water quality requirements for all surface waters of the state.

Webinars

Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program WRRSP 2023 Updates and Highlights