As a precautionary response to COVID-19, Ohio EPA is currently operating with most staff working remotely. If you are working with our staff on a current project and you know the name of the employee you are working with, email them at firstname.lastname@epa.ohio.gov or call them directly. The Agency website has contact information for every district, division, and office. In order to reach us, please contact Ohio EPA’s main phone line at (614) 644-3020 or the main line for the division or office you are trying to reach.

After March 23, our district offices and Central Office will be temporarily closed and will have increasingly limited ability to receive deliveries, plans, etc. All entities are encouraged to submit plans, permit applications, etc., electronically where there are existing avenues to do so, such as the eBusiness Center (eBiz). Please refer to the list of available services on the main eBiz webpage. We encourage you to make use of all that apply, even if you have not used eBiz in the past. Plans under 25 MB can be emailed. For large plans over 25 MB, entities should work with the reviewer/division to upload via LiquidFiles. Directions for submitting docs via LiquidFiles is available on YouTube. We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you in advance for your understanding.

To report a spill or environmental emergency, contact the spill hotline (800) 282-9378 or (614) 224-0946

The Resource rss

Helping communities and businesses access compliance, technical and financial assistance for their environmental needs.

Learn the Lingo

Do environmental terms sometimes sound like a foreign language to you? If so, you’re not alone. Many businesses and communities have difficulty keeping up with the latest environmental lingo. This feature will cover some common environmental terms you may encounter.

Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) -The Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) of 1986 was created to help communities plan for chemical emergencies. It requires industry to report the storage, use and releases of hazardous substances to federal, state, and local governments. EPCRA requires state and local governments to use this information to prepare their community for dealing with potential risks.

State Emergency Response Commission (SERC) - SERC is the administrative body that implements the Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) in Ohio.

Risk Management Plan (RMP) - Facilities that use extremely hazardous substances are required to develop a Risk Management Plan. These plans must be revised and resubmitted to U.S. EPA every five years. The information required from facilities under RMP helps local fire, police, and emergency response personnel prepare for and respond to chemical emergencies. RMPs also foster communication and awareness to improve accident prevention and emergency response practices at the local level. The RMP rule was built upon existing industry codes and standards. It requires facilities that use listed regulated Toxic or Flammable Substances for Accidental Release Prevention to develop an RMP and submit that plan to EPA.