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Recycling Grants Available from Ohio EPA

Webinar Scheduled for Jan. 6, 2022; Applications Due Feb. 4, 2022

Ohio EPA is accepting applications for recycling and litter prevention grants to public and private organizations around the state. The application deadline is Feb. 4, 2022, at 3 p.m.

Interested applicants are encouraged to participate in an upcoming webinar on Jan. 6, 2022 to learn about Ohio EPA’s Recycling and Litter Prevention Grant application process and the activities targeted by the grant program. The webinar will take place from 10-11:30 a.m. Register for the webinar here.

This highly competitive grant program provides opportunities for local governments, schools, private businesses, and nonprofit organizations to establish and implement recycling and litter prevention programs, recycling market development for manufacturers, expansion of recycling and processing facilities, and recycling infrastructure improvements.

Four categories of grants are available:

  • Academic institution grants up to $100,000 to schools with a 25 percent match or for construction projects using ground tire rubber, up to $300,000 with a 100 percent match;
  • Community and litter grants up to $200,000 with a 25 percent match to local governments and nonprofits;
  • Market development grants for private businesses up to $200,000 with 100 percent match (requires a government sponsor); and
  • Scrap tire grants available for businesses, local governments, and nonprofits up to $300,000 with a 100 percent match (requires businesses to have a government sponsor).

Grants will be awarded in July 2022. More information about the Recycling and Litter Prevention Grant program is available online.

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epa.ohio.gov

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency was created in 1972 to consolidate efforts to protect and improve air quality, water quality and waste management in Ohio. Since then, air pollutants dropped by as much as 90 percent; large rivers meeting standards improved from 21 percent to 89 percent; and hundreds of polluting, open dumps were replaced with engineered landfills and an increased emphasis on waste reduction and recycling.