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New H2Ohio Grant Opportunity to Help Drinking Water Systems Pay for Equipment

As part of his comprehensive strategy to improve water quality in Ohio, Governor Mike DeWine and Ohio EPA Director Laurie Stevenson announced today that his H2Ohio initiative will be investing $1 million in mini grants for drinking water system equipment needs in communities across the state.


Ohio EPA is now accepting applications for up to $10,000 equipment mini grants until Jan. 25, 2023. These grant opportunities aim to strengthen the ability of public water systems to reduce leaks, purchase critical equipment, evaluate rates, and successfully operate into the future. Public water systems can apply at: https://epa.ohio.gov/divisions-and-offices/drinking-and-ground-waters/public-water-systems/financial-assistance.

Types of equipment eligible to be funded through an H2Ohio equipment mini grant


These grant funds will be awarded to help community water systems purchase equipment, such as:


•    valve exercising equipment;  
•    clamp-on flowmeters to check accuracy of meters;   
•    pressure loggers;  
•    kits to measure hydrant flow and perform hydrant condition assessment;  
•    Amplified Listening Device to detect leaks in the distribution system;   
•    metal pipe locator; and
•    training on the use of the above equipment.
 

Governor DeWine launched H2Ohio in 2019 as a water quality effort to provide clean and safe water to Ohio. The Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Ohio Department of Agriculture, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, and Ohio Lake Erie Commission each have a significant role in H2Ohio through the natural infrastructure of wetlands, a reduction in nutrient runoff, and increased access to clean drinking water and quality sewer systems. To learn more, visit h2.ohio.gov.


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epa.ohio.gov

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency was created in 1972 to consolidate efforts to protect and improve air quality, water quality and waste management in Ohio. Since then, air pollutants dropped by as much as 90 percent; large rivers meeting standards improved from 21 percent to 89 percent; and hundreds of polluting, open dumps were replaced with engineered landfills and an increased emphasis on waste reduction and recycling.