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Key Accomplishments

Division of Air Pollution Control (DAPC)

Top Accomplishments

  • The reduction in sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions has led to significant reduction in ambient concentrations.
  • Large reductions in Greenhouse Gas emissions from Ohio utility sector.
  • The reduction in ambient ozone levels.
  • The reduction in particulate emissions has led to significant reduction in ambient concentrations.
  • The evolution of Ohio EPA’s ambient air monitoring network using state of the art technology and data collection modernization.
  • The elimination of air pollution alerts in Ohio.
  • The conversion of permitting system and implementation of the Title V program (STARS2).
  • The implementation of enhancements and efficiency improvements in permitting including the following permitting improvements: Permit-to-Install and Operate (PTIO), Permit by rule, general permits and Title V permits.
  • The integration of the Ohio Department of Health’s Asbestos Program and Ohio EPA’s Asbestos Program. Ohio EPA’s Asbestos Program now provides a streamlined service to the regulated community.
  • The replacement of the Federal Implementation Plan (FIP) for SO2 with the state plan.

Site-Specific Work

Honda Complex (CDO)

County: Union to start, now Logan, Shelby
Circa: 1970s – present

Ohio EPA has been permitting the original Honda plants and their expansion in Ohio over five decades.  When Honda came to Ohio starting with the Motorcycle Plant in 1979 and the Marysville Auto Plant shortly after (1982), it was declared the largest economic development project in Ohio at the time.  Since then, Ohio EPA has expeditiously processed numerous air and water permits to help them update and expand their automobile manufacturing operations, most recently with the new Performance Manufacturing Center, completed in 2012, that manufactures the NSX super car. Ohio EPA is happy Honda continues to select Ohio for their development and will continue regulating any future facilities.

Intel Corporation – Ohio Campus (CDO)

County: Licking
Circa: January 2022 – present

In January 2022, the Intel Corporation announced that they were planning to build a new manufacturing campus to make semiconductor chips in New Albany, Ohio to help meet surging consumer demand. It is the largest economic development project in Ohio’s history with an initial investment of $20 billion and 10,000 Intel and construction jobs to be created. Ohio EPA met with Intel at least weekly to learn the complex manufacturing process and pollution control equipment and work to write the air and water permits that were needed to start construction of the facilities and ensure the environment is protected. The air permit was finalized in September after holding a public hearing and addressing public comments and the water permits are being actively worked on and on-schedule to meet the tight construction deadlines.

Ford Plantwide Applicability Limit (NEDO)

County: Lorain
Circa: 2013

On October 24, 2013, NEDO-DAPC issued the state’s first, and one of the county’s first, permits containing a Plantwide Applicability Limit (PAL) to Ford’s Ohio Assembly Plant in Avon Lake. This permit essentially allows for a ten-year facility-wide limit for a federally regulated pollutant based on past actual emissions. This type of permit allows complex facilities with lots of sources like automobile assembly plants to have more flexibility in making changes to existing sources and installing new sources without burdensome up-front permitting requirements.

Expansion of the oil and gas industry in Southeast Ohio

County: Southeast Ohio
Circa: 2010s – present

Beginning in the early 2010s, the state of Ohio saw a rapid increase in oil and gas activity. This growth mainly occurred in eastern Ohio, with many of the associated facilities located in the Southeast District of Ohio EPA. Currently, the Southeast District Office regulates approximately eight hundred oil and gas facilities. There are four main oil and gas facility types: well sites, processing, midstream operations, and related/support activities. It is the role of Ohio EPA to evaluate these sources, issue applicable permits and ensure they are in compliance with appropriate rules and regulations. To keep up with industry growth, Ohio EPA created two types of general permits specific to the oil and gas industry: one for well pad operations and the other for compressor stations. The use of general permits has helped to streamline the permitting process while ensuring human health and the environment is protected.

Open Burning (SEDO)

County: Southeast Ohio
Circa: 1970s – present

In 1972 most people in Southeast Ohio burned their waste in burn barrels behind their homes, the rest sent their trash to one of the 121 unlined Landfills spread around Southeast Ohio. Now most people have their trash hauled to one of our 10 heavily engineered lined landfills.

Steubenville (SEDO)

County: Jefferson
Circa: 1970s

Two large studies in the 1990s further cemented particulate pollution as a danger. Both studies compiled immense data sets on ordinary Americans and their environments. The so-called Six Cities study, begun at Harvard in 1974, found that in the study area with the fewest particles, Portage, Wisconsin, there were 26 percent fewer deaths from lung and heart diseases than in the city with the dirtiest air, which was Steubenville, Ohio. The heart- and lung-damaging effects of particles of 10 microns in diameter and smaller have since been reproduced by many other studies, including the American Cancer Society’s survey of air quality in 150 American cities. In 1997, these studies prompted the Ohio EPA to tighten its regulations on particulate pollution, and the Agency began regulating even smaller particles, those just 2.5 microns. Steubenville is now in attainment of all air pollutants. This is quite an improvement considering where Steubenville started.

Middletown Coke (SEDO)

County: Butler
Circa: 2008-present

Middletown Coke installed a Heat Recovery Coke Oven Battery in 2008. A unique requirement in the Permit to Install for the Coke Oven Battery was the requirement for the installation and operation of an Ambient Air Monitoring system to ensure compliance with the National Ambient Air Quality Standards in the communities surrounding Middletown Coke. Middletown Coke was required to purchase two Particulate Matter 10 Microns and Smaller in Diameter (PM10) monitors, four Particulate Matter 2.5 Microns and Smaller in Diameter (PM2.5) monitors and two Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant monitors. These monitors were sited and are operated by the Southwest Ohio Air Pollution Control Agency. The Ambient Air Monitoring required in the 2008 Permit to Install continues through today. All cost associated with the ambient air quality monitoring system are paid by Middletown Coke.

Division of Drinking and Ground Waters (DDAGW)

Site-Specific Work

Mt. Air water distribution system solution (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 2010s

Mt. Air is a small community north of Columbus in Franklin County that started as a vacation community on the banks of the Olentangy River.  As the community grew, the drinking water infrastructure was cobbled together and maintained by the residents, with neighbors helping maintain the system.  As the vacation homes became full time residences, the aging infrastructure became strained and resulted in frequent water outages.  When Mt. Air realized that they could not maintain the system needs, they asked Ohio EPA for assistance. DDAGW helped them create a water district that allowed them to connect to the Del-Co water system, and to replace the entire water distribution system.     

John R Doutt Upground Reservoir (CDO)

County: Delaware, Union
Circa: 2010s

The City of Columbus’s John R Doutt Upground Reservoir was completed in 2013 to support central Ohio’s future growth. The 9-billion-gallon reservoir is located on 843 acres in Delaware and Union Counties near the Scioto River. The reservoir is filled by an inflatable dam and pump station and then gravity feeds back to the river when there would be water quantity concerns. This reservoir can provide an additional 29 million gallons per day for water to be treated. There are two additional upground reservoirs planned in the future. This reservoir has become a stop for migratory birds with several rare species being spotted.

Pipeline project West Farmington and Southington (NEDO)

County: Trumbull
Circa: 2018-present

The project brought water lines from Newton Falls to the western part of Trumbull County, including West Farmington, Southington and Braceville. The largest water project in Trumbull County’s history received approval from the Ohio EPA for $12 million that included zero percent interest on the loan for 30 years, and 50 percent principal forgiveness.

Kenton drinking water (NWDO)

County: Hardin
Circa: 2019

The City of Kenton experienced several breaks in a large aging waterline leaving the drinking water treatment plant. This waterline was beyond its useful life resulting in catastrophic failures putting the entire city without water service while the repairs were made. In 2019, the City was required by Ohio EPA to prioritize replacement of this critical waterline. The City utilized the Water Supply Revolving Loan Fund for the construction costs of the water line replacement. Additional aged waterlines in downtown Kenton were replaced providing more reliable drinking water service to the citizens and businesses of Kenton.

South Bass Island (NWDO)

County: Ottawa
Circa: 2004

In August of 2004, working alongside CDC, ODH and local health department officials, Ohio EPA employees investigated over 1,400 waterborne gastrointestinal illnesses. Multiple investigations were conducted to determine the following: ground water quality; contamination sources; interventions to prevent further illness; actions to improve drinking water quality. Immediate actions and short-term projects were developed to address the issues found, resulting in improved drinking water quality for all.

City of Logan Public Water System (SEDO)

County: Hocking
Circa: 2016-2020

On June 24, 2016, the City of Logan Public Water System depressurized for approximately a week due to a routine (not out of the ordinary or extraordinary) line break, nonfunctional valves and lack of distribution system instructional knowledge. Subsequent major depressurizations and stalled DFFO negotiations lead to issuance of unilateral orders on July 28, 2017. The City with funding from several sources including Ohio EPA subsequently researched, identified and repaired or replaced valves within the distribution system to half then quarter and ultimately isolate breaks to one city block. The City also reduced water loss and started a rigorous valve exercise program as well as replace their water treatment plant. The Unilateral DFFOs were successfully terminated on September 24, 2020.

Kudos to the City administration, distribution crews and our current SEDO DDAGW team for a successful outcome.

Southeast Ohio Drinking Water (SEDO)

County: Southeast Ohio

Southeast Ohio’s drinking water has seen much success over the last 50 years, with many of those successes in regionalization. Many Southeast Ohio communities have again infrastructure and strained budgets to help with the upkeep of these their systems. Ohio EPA has assisted in funding of many Southeast Ohio water and wastewater infrastructure projects, some of which include opportunities for communities to share services, interconnecting utilities and full regionalization.

Byesville Water (SEDO)

County: Guernsey
Circa: 2008 - 2011

In 2008, Ohio EPA’s Southeast District Office coordinated with the Village of Byesville to take over operation of the Cumberland Public Water System. Cumberland is located in Guernsey County and at the time had approximately 210 service connections serving a population of 485. The water treatment plant was falling into disrepair, highlighting the critical need for asset management programs statewide, and the necessity to consolidate that water system. Cumberland’s wells were not ideal, being mine shaft wells that were under the direct influence of surface water. On July 1, 2008, Byesville Public Water system agreed to take over the operation and management of Cumberland water, with the goal of regionalizing and decommissioning the treatment plant and wells. On March 10, 2011, Cumberland had connected to Byesville as a satellite system and Cumberland PWS was inactivated.

Lawrence Water Corporation (SEDO)

County: Lawrence
Circa: 2015

On May 15, 2015, Lawrence Water Corporation (LWC) was purchased and absorbed by Hecla Water Association as a part of a regionalization effort to address the service issues at the water system, including habitual depressurization issues due to overdevelopment in some of the areas served by under-sized tanks. LWC was purchasing water from Hecla Water Association as a satellite system, distributing water to several booster stations and storage tanks serving 2,000 connections and a population of 5,600.  

In the spring of 2015, LWC experienced a system-wide depressurization that lasted for several weeks, putting nearly all of their users out of water entirely. One of the booster stations serving a large area experienced a flood, damaging the pumps beyond use. Backup pumps were brought in which also failed due to another operational incident. The system depressurized and when replacement pumps were finally sourced and installed, it became clear that Lawrence Water Corp. was not able to maintain enough water to serve all customers without the risk of frequent depressurizations.

Ohio EPA officials, Lawrence County EMA, and others were on scene for weeks trying to correct the issues to no avail. After some discussion, Hecla agreed to purchase and absorb Lawrence Water Corporation, including all users and system assets

2019 Dayton Tornados (SWDO)

County: Montgomery, surrounding area
Circa: 2019

On May 27, 2019, 15 tornados hit the Greater Dayton region. Because of the significant damages sustained from this weather outbreak, Ohio EPA’s Southwest District Office staff were heavily engaged, around the clock, in response and with assistance activities. Ohio EPA staff contacted all drinking water and wastewater plants in the affected areas to assess operations and link them with resources to aid in restoration of services in an expeditious manner. Ohio EPA also provided around the clock assistance to both Dayton and Montgomery County as Dayton was trying to restore water service while power was out, and one water plant was heavily damaged. In addition, Ohio EPA coordinated with local health departments, county officials and the waste service industry to help with waste and debris management. Ohio EPA was very proud to be a part of the efforts in helping these communities in wake of such disasters.

Dayton Source Water Protection Program (SWDO)

County: Montgomery
Circa: 1985-present

In 1985, the city of Dayton implemented their multi-jurisdictional Source Water Protection Program (SWPP) through a memorandum of understanding with Ohio EPA. After the 1987 Sherwin Williams warehouse fire, which reportedly cost over $12 million in clean-up and monitoring expenses, Dayton adopted wellfield ordinances to require businesses located within the City’s Source Water Protection Area (SWPA) to inventory specific regulated substances at their facilities. In 1996, Dayton’s SWPP became the first Source Water Protection Plan in the state to be endorsed by Ohio EPA. To promote SWPP efforts and provide outreach to local residents living in the SWPP, Dayton has held their annual Children’s Water Festival since 1997 for school children from the area to learn about the importance of protecting our surface and ground waters. In addition to zoning ordinances and public outreach, the City created a Source Water Protection Fund to provide financial assistance through grants and zero-interest loans to local business in the SWPA to reduce their risk to ground water.

Division of Environmental and Financial Assistance (DEFA)

Top Accomplishments

SRF Loan Programs

Ohio’s two highly successful State Revolving Fund (SRF) loan programs, the Water Pollution Control Loan Fund (WPCLF) and the Drinking Water Assistance Fund/Water Supply Revolving Loan Account (WSRLA), are the state’s major sources of public financing for wastewater and drinking water infrastructure. Administered by Ohio EPA’s Division of Environmental and Financial Assistance, the WPCLF has awarded over 2,900 loans totaling nearly $11.6 billion since its inception in 1989, while the WSRLA has awarded over 1,000 loans totaling nearly $2.4 billion since it began in 1999.

Compliance Assistance Unit

Ohio EPA’s Wastewater Compliance Assistance Unit (CAU) is nationally recognized for its innovation and its demonstrated ability to assist all manner of poorly functioning wastewater treatment facilities throughout the state. Rather than simply citing wastewater plants for non-compliance or offering potential future funding assistance, the DEFA wastewater CAU personnel provide hands-on diagnostic assessments and training to plant operators and personnel so they can successfully address problem issues and return to compliance as quickly and inexpensively as possible. Hundreds of mostly small wastewater treatment plants all over Ohio have benefitted from this creative approach to problem-solving and permit compliance over the past 25-plus years.

Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program

Also nationally recognized and cited as an example of innovated funding by U.S. EPA is DEFA’s Water Resource Restoration Sponsor Program (WRRSP). Developed by DEFA staff and management in 1999 and implemented in 2000, the WRRSP is intended to restore and/or permanently protect the highest quality streams, wetlands, and related water resources throughout Ohio. In collaboration with WPCLF sponsoring loan projects, to date, the WRRSP has awarded over $283 million for stream and wetland restoration and protection projects all over Ohio, including more than 20 dam removals.

Household Sewage Treatment Systems

To help address a longstanding and seemingly intractable problem with failing household sewage treatment systems (HSTS) across the state, DEFA partnered with the Ohio Department of Health to create a special funding mechanism for upgrading or replacing failing HSTS. By providing principal forgiveness funds (loans that don’t have to be repaid) directly to county health departments, who, in turn, identify qualifying HSTS projects in their counties and arrange for individual HSTS repair or replacement, hundreds of these poorly performing or failing systems are now being replaced every year with approvable HSTS. Most of Ohio’s counties have been – and continue to be - participants in this very effective program, which has made over $88 million available to county health departments.

Ohio Power Siting Board

Ohio EPA is one of several state agencies that comprise the Ohio Power Siting Board (OPSB), tasked with reviewing and approving or rejecting plans for electric and gas transmission line projects and electric generating facilities (including wind farms and solar arrays) in Ohio. As a member agency, Ohio EPA can also provide technical support to the OPSB as it conducts its required reviews. From 1993 until about 2013, DEFA directly assisted the OPSB staff with the environmental and construction-related reviews for many of its transmission and generation facilities, helping establish new project standards and practices for environmental protection that are still in use today.

Outreach and Education

Prior to 1990 Ohio EPA almost solely focused on regulatory enforcement where regulated entities were expected to know environmental regulations on their own or face stiff fines, penalties or closure of their operations.  The Office of Compliance Assistance and Pollution Prevention (OCAPP) made efforts to reach out and educate regulated entities (and others) of their environmental requirements so they could continue their operations while improving Ohio’s environment.  OCAPP completed hundreds of assistance publications, provided hundreds of presentations and sent thousands of e-mail notifications and mass-mailings to regulated entities putting our education and outreach efforts on par with our inspection, permitting and enforcement activities.

Environmental Assistance

OCAPP has assisted thousands of businesses and other organizations in meeting their environmental requirements through onsite visits, over-the-phone or via e-mail.

Beyond Compliance

OCAPP has assisted hundreds of businesses and other organizations meet their sustainability goals and helped thousands more understand how pollution prevention can help them become more sustainable, resilient and reduce their environmental requirements.

Innovative Outreach

OCAPP was the first part of Ohio EPA to adopt and implement in a significant manner, outreach tools that were innovative for their time.  Items such as fact sheets (more than 300 created), web pages (more than 70% of the agency’s web pages in 2000) and video tutorials (nearly a dozen created prior to 2000) are now viewed as standard ways to communicate our environmental programs.

Economic Incentives

OCAPP led the effort to incorporate economic concerns into environmental protection strategies to help businesses not only improve the environment, but to thrive while doing so.  OCAPP led the nation in supplemental environmental projects in enforcement settlements – where a business would agree to implement long-term, ongoing waste reduction technologies in exchange for a reduced penalty.  They also helped hundreds of businesses identify multiple ways to meet compliance and waste reduction goals so the most economically advantageous option could be selected.  As opposed to prior “one-size fits all” approaches that were mandated regardless of costs.

Site-Specific Work

City of Columbus Lower Olentangy Tunnel or Columbus Relief Sewer (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 2020

The Lower Olentangy Tunnel (LOT) is a 12-foot diameter tunnel project that extends approximately 17,000 linear feet (or 3.4 miles in length) south from Tuttle Park, just north of Ohio State University’s campus, to Vine Street in the Arena District in downtown Columbus. The LOT is being constructed to pick up combined sewer overflows (CSOs) to provide relief at connection points along existing interceptor sewers located near the Olentangy River. This is the largest WPCLF loan in fund’s history at $285 million but will provide adequate conveyance capacity and inline storage to eliminate sewage overflows to the Olentangy River.

Pipeline project West Farmington and Southington (NEDO)

County: Trumbull
Circa: 2018-present

The project brought water lines from Newton Falls to the western part of Trumbull County, including West Farmington, Southington and Braceville. The largest water project in Trumbull County’s history received approval from the Ohio EPA for $12 million that included zero percent interest on the loan for 30 years, and 50 percent principal forgiveness.

Ballville Dam Removal (NWDO)

County: Sandusky
Circa: 2009-2018

The dam was originally used by the Ohio Power Company as a hydroelectric power source and in 1959 was purchased by the City of Fremont to use as a source of public water supply. Due to deterioration over time and maintenance issues with the dam, the City of Fremont constructed an intake channel and reservoir upstream of the dam that has been operating since 2013 as the City’s main source of water. From 2009-2011, the project received multiple WRRSP awards from Ohio EPA. Dam removal work did not begin until 2018, with additional restoration work extending beyond that. This project is a great example of a WRRSP project leveraging dollars and collaboration with federal partners to remove a dam.

Butler Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility (NWDO)

County: Richland
Circa: 2021

One of Ohio’s first wastewater regionalization projects, the Butler Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility eliminated four non-compliant treatment systems (Village of Bellville, the Village of Butler, Clear Fork Mobile Home Park, and Clear Fork Schools). Through the encouragement, facilitation, and funding from Ohio EPA, Ohio Public Works Commission and Community Development Block Grants, this project addressed significant pollution in the Clear Fork of the Mohican River The new plant became operational in the spring of 2021.

Steubenville Drinking Water (SEDO)

County: Jefferson
Circa: 2001-2019

Steubenville received its first drinking water loan from Ohio EPA in 2001. In 2019, the city of Steubenville completed an overhaul on their drinking water infrastructure using funding from Ohio EPA which was $7 million in total and $3.5 million principal forgiveness.

Devola Sewer Project (SEDO)

County: Washington
Circa: 2021-present

The community of Devola is currently unsewered, and the failure of an abundance of household sewage treatment systems are causing threats to public health. H2Ohio funding awarded to Washington County will connect Devola’s approximately 500 homes and businesses to the county sewer system and eliminate the need for home septic systems. Construction began in 2022. Other funding sources include U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the American Rescue Plan Act. This is a great example of both state and federal partners working together to protect public health.

Nelsonville Wastewater Treatment Plant (SEDO)

County: Athens
Circa: 2018- present

The city of Nelsonville received funding from Ohio EPA to build a new wastewater treatment plant and install additional collection lines. This new plant will accept wastewater from Murray City, Carbon Hill, and Buchtel. Starting with a $955,700 design loan in April 2018, Ohio EPA has provided over $19 million to Nelsonville and surrounding communities for a new, regional wastewater collection and treatment system.

Division of Environmental Response and Revitalization (DERR)

Top Accomplishments

Development of the Voluntary Action Program (1994)

Ohio’s Voluntary Action Program (VAP) was created in September 1994 and was fully implemented in early 1997. The program was created to allow eligible participants a way to investigate possible environmental contamination, clean it up if necessary, and receive a promise from the State of Ohio (via a CNS) that no more cleanup is needed. In 2021, 29 Covenants not to sue were issued for a total of 1,412 acres.

Authorization of the hazardous waste management program (RCRA Authorization 1989)

The DERR Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) program oversees the permitting, inspection, compliance, closure, corrective action, and reporting of hazardous waste sites. The hazardous waste programs ensure cradle to grave hazardous waste management to ensure hazardous wastes are handled in a manner protective of human health and the environment. Hazardous waste tracking through the national hazardous waste handler database, RCRA info, characterizes facility status, regulated activities, and compliance histories.

Development of Cessation of Regulated Operations program (1996)

Cessation of Regulated Operations (CRO) is a law codified in Chapter 3752 of the Ohio Revised Code. The CRO program regulates certain businesses in the state that close, sell or move. CRO ensures that a facility is free from hazardous substances before the business vacates the property. By definition, CRO is the discontinuation or termination of regulated operation. Regulated operations include the production, use, storage or handling of regulated substances. The goal of this program is to prevent a substantial threat to public health and the environment by eliminating potential release of hazardous substances at a nonoperating or abandoned facility. These sites can cause environmental and human health hazards that can result in extremely high cleanup costs, health care costs and/or loss of habitat.

Targeted Brownfield Assessment Program

The Targeted Brownfield Assessment (TBA) program provides property assessment services at no cost to eligible applicants. Capitalized by a grant from U.S. EPA, the brownfield assistance programs target community driven projects in need of property assessment and technical assistance. Eligible applicants include local government entities such as counties, cities, villages, townships, port authorities and county land banks. The Ohio Brownfields Inventory includes 2,833 properties.

Site investigation/state remedial program/NRDA

The DERR Site Investigation Field Unit (SIFU) was originally formed in July 1990. Since then, SIFU has worked with Ohio EPA district office personnel to complete approximately 560 site assessment projects at hundreds of sites with grant funding from U.S. EPA. SIFU has also completed hundreds of site assessment projects with state funding. The majority of these sites have been evaluated to require no further action, while others are now Superfund sites or have been addressed through state investigation and cleanup orders. Ultimately, SIFU activities have aided in ensuring protection of human health and the environment at these sites, in evaluating and identifying sites that can be readily redeveloped, and in identifying those sites that need to be addressed as Superfund sites or through state orders.

The remedial response program determines whether or not potentially contaminated sites represent a risk to human health or the environment and whether they are safe for their intended uses. In cases where cleanup is necessary, the remedial response program identifies the preferred remedial alternative and oversees the cleanup. Natural Resource Damage Assessment and Restoration assesses injury to natural resources held in public trust that result from releases of hazardous wastes or oil.

Site-Specific Work

Newark Processing (CDO)

County: Licking
Circa: 1980s-2010s

Newark Processing was a secondary aluminum recycling facility in Licking County, adjacent to the Licking River, and operated from 1980 until they declared bankruptcy in1996.  Ohio EPA issued director’s final findings and orders to Newark Processing in 1988 for surface water violations, which they complied with until they ceased operation in 1996. The bankruptcy court awarded Ohio EPA approximately $300,000 in 2002.  In 2004 Ohio EPA observed the stockpiled waste material eroding rather dramatically into the Licking River.  The Ohio EPA approached the United States Army Corp of Engineers (USACE) in 2005 for assistance due to their expertise in constructing stream bank stabilization projects, and was able to provide USACE with $2.8 million from the hazardous waste cleanup fund that allowed them to undertake the riverbank stabilization project.

On April 20, 2007, to commemorate the 37th anniversary of Earth Day, Ohio EPA Director Korleski hosted a media event in Newark with the USACE and Newark. Construction occurred in 2008-2009.  Following that, in 2009, the city of Newark received a $2 million Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund grant to cap the site.  Ohio EPA also made available the city bankruptcy settlement money to help fund the preparation of the VAP no further action letter, which was submitted in 2012.  Ohio EPA issued the VAP covenant not to sue in 2013.  Today the site supports a solar panel farm that supplies power to the Newark wastewater treatment plan.

Newark Processing (CDO)

County: Licking
Circa: 1990s – 2000s

Newark Processing was a secondary aluminum recycling facility in Licking County, adjacent to the Licking River, and operated from 1980 until they declared bankruptcy in1996.  Ohio EPA issued director’s final findings and orders to Newark Processing in 1988 for surface water violations, which they complied with until they ceased operation in 1996. The bankruptcy court awarded Ohio EPA approximately $300,000 in 2002.  In 2004 Ohio EPA observed the stockpiled waste material eroding rather dramatically into the Licking River.  The Ohio EPA approached the United States Army Corp of Engineers (USACE) in 2005 for assistance due to their expertise in constructing stream bank stabilization projects, and was able to provide USACE with $2.8 million from the hazardous waste cleanup fund that allowed them to undertake the riverbank stabilization project.

On April 20, 2007, to commemorate the 37th anniversary of Earth Day, Ohio EPA Director Korleski hosted a media event in Newark with the USACE and Newark. Construction occurred in 2008-2009.  Following that, in 2009, the city of Newark received a $2 million Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund grant to cap the site.  Ohio EPA also made available the city bankruptcy settlement money to help fund the preparation of the VAP no further action letter, which was submitted in 2012.  Ohio EPA issued the VAP covenant not to sue in 2013.  Today the site supports a solar panel farm that supplies power to the Newark wastewater treatment plan.

American Ditch (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 2010s

American Ditch is located in Columbus, north of the American Addition neighborhood. The sediment in American Ditch was contaminated with cadmium and zinc runoff from the former ASARCO property.  Using money from the ASARCO bankruptcy settlement, in 2017 Ohio EPA assessed and contracted out the cleanup of a 500-foot section of American Ditch. A total of 245 tons of contaminated sediment were removed and properly disposed.  In addition, 47 tons of solid waste, 5 tons of tires, and 8 cubic yards of transite, an asbestos containing material, were removed from the ditch and nearby.  The clean-up of the ditch removed contaminated sediment and waste from a historically underserved neighborhood in Columbus.

Closed Loop (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 2010s

From 2012-2016, Closed Loop Refining and Recovery recycled CRTs (computer monitors) at three leased Columbus Warehouse locations. At their peak production, they were processing upwards of 350,000 pounds/week of monitors and TVs. In April of 2016, the facility shut down and the owners abandoned all three warehouses leaving an initially estimated 160 million pounds of hazardous waste – primarily the lead contaminated CRTs.  A joint effort between the Ohio EPA, the property owners (Garrison Southfield Park and Olymbec), and the Ohio Attorney General’s office resulted in a 17.1 million dollar clean-up and removal project that has finished almost 2 years ahead of schedule.  To date 130 million pounds have been sent to a hazardous waste landfill, and two of the three warehouses have been sold and re-leased.

Former A.C. Humko Property to Harrison West Neighborhood Transformation (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 2000s

The former A.C. Humko Property was an 11-acre abandoned brownfield site located at 525 West First Avenue, Columbus, with a long history of various industrial manufacturing operations. Spills from a former sulfuric acid plant mixed with fuel oil spills to form hydrogen sulfide in soil gas. With the assistance of Clean Ohio Funds, the former A.C. Humko property remediation was conducted to remove the hydrogen sulfide in soil gas and to remediate ground water. A large excavation done to the water table was conducted to remove the residual fuel oil from the top of ground water.  Photographs of the brownfield site and the cleanup are available.  In 2006 a Voluntary Action Program no further action (NFA) letter was issued for the property and a covenant not to sue (CNS) was issued by Ohio EPA, signifying the completion of environmental cleanup activities. The property was then redeveloped into the major portion of Harrison West residential neighborhood with condominiums, apartments, and a community center with park.

Bowers Landfill (CDO)

County: Pickaway
Circa: 1908s-1990s

Bowers Landfill is located in Pickaway County, adjacent to the Scioto River.  The landfill operated from 1958 until 1968 as a municipal landfill that received chemical and solid wastes from local industries. Surface water samples collected in 1980 by U.S. EPA, ground water samples collected in 1981 by the property owner, and surface water and leachate samples collected in 1982 and 1983 by Ohio EPA found significant levels of volatile organic compounds, which indicated that the landfill posed a significant threat to human health and the environment. It was added to the National Priorities List (NPL, Superfund) in 1983 and the record of decision summarizing the cleanup action was signed in 1989.  The cleanup action took place in 1992-1993.  In addition to the landfill cap, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineer constructed wetlands between the landfill and the Scioto River.  Bowers Landfill was deleted from the NPL in 1997, the first NPL site to be delisted in Ohio.  Operation and maintenance, which is conducted by the responsible parties, continues at the landfill and the wetlands are home to a variety of waterfowl and wildlife.

Scotts Landfill (CDO)

County: Union
Circa: 1990s

DERR sampling in the mid 90’s detected numerous problematic pollutants in the grounds surrounding the Scotts manufacturing facility near Marysville. Surface water sampling confirmed loss of these compounds to waters of the state. Scotts consolidated these materials into more secure landfills and conducted stream restoration work resulting in greatly

Whittier Peninsula (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 2008-2015

The Whittier Peninsula consists of four properties that were historically used for industrial facilities, processing plants, mining, asphalt processing and concrete manufacturing, landfill activity, automotive machining, electrostatic painting, rail car repair and manufacturing and a railroad corridor. Redevelopment of the properties was achieved through the VAP with CNSs issued in 2008 through 2015. The properties are currently an Audubon Nature Center, bike/walking path along the Scioto River, trailways, shelters, restrooms, an obstacle course, and as office space for Franklin County Metro Parks and the Columbus Recreation and Parks Department.

Partnerships

  • Columbus and Franklin County Metroparks
  • Audubon

GMC Delphi – Hollywood Casino (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 2012

The Delphi Site consists of 112.501 acres. The Property was used by General Motors Corporation and later Delphi Automotive Systems, LLC, since approximately 1945, for an automotive parts manufacturing facility. The property was redeveloped through the VAP with a CNS issued in 2012. The property is now the Hollywood Casino.

Partnerships

  • City of Columbus
  • RACER Trust
  • Todd Davis (Attorney)/Craig Casper (CP)

Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant (NEDO)

County: Portage
Circa: 1980s-present

The former Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant, now known as the Camp James A. Garfield Joint Military Training Center, is a 21,683 acre. At the onset of World War II, the Ravenna Army Ammunition Plant (RVAAP) was built to produce large-caliber artillery projectiles and bombs. Although RVAAP downsized after WW II, plant production lines were reactivated during the Korean War and the Vietnam conflicts. Additionally, the plant conducted nearly continuous demilitarization of war stocks, refurbishment of inventoried ammunition, and minor research and development projects through 1992.

The RVAAP restoration program involves cleanup of former production/operational areas throughout the facility related to former activities conducted under the RVAAP. Production at the former RVAAP began in December 1941 with the primary missions of depot storage and ammunition loading. Ohio EPA has been actively involved in site investigation and remediation activities since the late 1980’s. In 2004, the Army and Ohio EPA signed DFFO’s that formalized the investigatory and remedial process for the entire facility. Over the past several years, there has been tremendous progress made at this site due to the partnership between the Army and Ohio EPA. Open communication and timely responses have ensured progress continues. The success of the project has received attention and recognition from DoD.

Partnerships

  • Army
  • Ohio Army National Guard

Nease Chemical (NEDO)

County: Columbiana
Circa: Early 2000s- 2021

The 44-acre Nease Chemical site is located near Salem in Columbiana County, Ohio. Between 1961 and 1973, Nease Chemical produced various chemical compounds, including household cleaning compounds, fire retardants and pesticides (most notably mirex, a probable human carcinogen). Facility operations contaminated soil and groundwater with hazardous substances. Ohio EPA worked with U.S. EPA to get this site listed on the NPL and remediation work performed. The site has multiple operating units, with records of decision completed in the early 2000s. The remedy caps, solidification of waste and installation of groundwater treatment and monitoring were confirmed as being complete in 2021.

Partnerships

  • U.S. EPA
  • U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service
  • Western Reserve Land Conservancy

Flats East Bank (NEDO)

County: Cuyahoga
Circa: 2000s-2019

The Flats East Development area is of one of Cleveland's most significant mixed-use development projects. The Flats East Bank project revived this blighted area, reshaping the downtown Cleveland skyline and establishing a new trend in experience-driven mixed-use living. The Flats East Development property has received two Clean Ohio Revitalization grants, both for $3 million dollars. The property has received three Covenants Not to Sue from Ohio EPA. This project would not have been possible without multiple public-private partnerships.

Krejci Dump Cleanup & Restoration (NEDO)

County: Summit
Circa: 1986-2010s

The Krejci Dump operated as a salvage yard and waste disposal facility from the 1940’s to 1980. In 1985, Cuyahoga Valley National Park acquired the property and soon realized the scale of pollution. Partnering with the U.S. and Ohio Environmental Protection Agencies, the park closed the site to the public in 1986 and initiated a comprehensive investigation. In a multi-year cleanup process, NPS worked in close coordination with Ford Motor Company, the lead corporation involved in the cleanup, to recontour and revegetate the site with native grasses and wildflowers, reestablish natural wetlands and restore important wildlife habitat. The NPS has since issued a certification of completion to Ford, finding that all requirements and performance standards for cleaning up and restoring the site had been achieved.

Ottawa River NRDA (NWDO)

County: Northwest Ohio
Circa: 2010- present

Decades of manufacturing activity and improper waste disposal practices resulted in the release of hazardous substances to the Ottawa River and its watershed. Hazardous substances have migrated from landfills along the banks of the Ottawa River and from industrial facilities in the watershed, contaminating water, fish, and wildlife in the Ottawa River and adjacent North Maumee Bay. Most of the landfills which were the sources of hazardous substances in the Ottawa River have been or are being remediated under CERCLA and other authorities. However, significant contamination remains in the Ottawa River. This has resulted in severely degraded fish and benthic invertebrate communities from approximately river mile 8.8 to the mouth of the Ottawa River, and potentially into northern Maumee Bay. The United States Department of the Interior, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Ohio EPA, collectively the Trustees, have recovered damages for these injuries. These damage settlements are dedicated to acquiring, protecting, and restoring habitats similar to those that were injured. Ducks Unlimited acquired and restored approximately 206 acres in the Western Lake Erie Watershed through application of the settlement.

Partnerships

  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife
  • Toledo Metroparks
  • Ducks Unlimited
  • ODNR

Imthurn Drum Site (NWDO)

County: Defiance
Circa: 1996- present

In 1996 an Ohio EPA investigator discovered 55-gallon drums containing organic solvents, waste oils, and paint-related materials on an old unused school property. Ohio EPA staff spent weeks sampling the drums to determine their contents. Ohio EPA worked with U.S. EPA to remove approximately 1800 fifty-five gallon drums containing hazardous wastes and approximately 21 truckloads of contaminated soil from the site.

Former Chevron clean up and redeveloped into Cleveland Cliffs (NWDO)

County: Lucas
Circa: 2000s-2021

Ohio EPA’s Voluntary Action Program encouraged the remediation efforts at a former Chevron property. This work led to Cleveland-Cliffs selecting the site for their newly constructed hot briquetted iron (HBI) project in Toledo, OH. Ohio EPA staff assisted the Port Authority and Cleveland-Cliffs to amend the covenant to sue to accommodate the redevelopment plans. Ohio EPA staff also worked collaboratively and efficiently to process several permits for this project.

Former Arena-Marina District & Acme Power Plant (NWDO)

County: Lucas
Circa: 2000s-present

Property along the Maumee River in downtown Toledo has undergone impressive revitalization. Previously housing the Toledo Sports Arena and the ACME coal fired power plant, today the former brownfield boasts restaurants, apartments, a clubhouse, a marina, a museum (National Museum of the Great Lakes) and a metropark (Toledo’s Glass City Metropark). Toledo Metroparks utilized dredged sediments from Maumee Harbor to help establish vegetation. The environmental redevelopment of this property was made possible through Ohio’s Voluntary Action Program and the first round of the Clean Ohio Revitalization Fund in the early 2000s.

Jeep Assembly (NWDO)

County: Lucas
Circa: 2010-2017

From 1888 to 2006, the Overland Industrial Park was home to Toledo's century-old automobile manufacturing hub, Toledo Jeep. The Toledo-Lucas County Port Authority (Port) acquired the historic Jeep property in 2010. Since that time the Port Authority has invested approximately $14 million to redevelop the site, addressing the site through Ohio’s Voluntary Action Program with the sole purpose of returning the Overland Industrial Park into an innovative business park that exemplifies sustainable industrial redevelopment.

On May 9, 2016, the Ohio EPA Voluntary Action Program issued a Covenant Not to Sue (CNS) for an 81 acre portion of the Toledo Jeep Assembly Plant property. On November 21, 2017, a second CNS was issued for an additional 29.5-acre portion of the property.

Today, Dana Holding Corporation operates a high-tech axle manufacturing facility and Detroit Mechanical Systems manufactures automotive parts for the Jeep Wrangler.  In 2020, a solar field was added to the northern portion of the property.

AMG Permitting/Exemption (SEDO)

County: Guernsey, Muskingum counties
Circa: 2021

AMG Vanadium converts spent refinery catalyst and other vanadium bearing residues into ferrovanadium (Ferovan®) and a ferronickel-molybdenum alloy (FeNiMoly®), which are marketed and sold to the carbon and stainless-steel industries. Through this environmentally beneficial conversion of waste materials into valuable products, AMG V provides an important solution and risk mitigation for refinery partners. They are headquartered in Cambridge, Ohio and in part due to the great working relationship they have with Ohio EPA, when it came time to expand their operations and build a second plant they invested in a second plant in Zanesville, Ohio.

Former Simonds Cutting Tools (SEDO)

County: Tuscarawas
Circa: 1980s- present

This site is an example of how Ohio EPA’s RCRA, VAP, and Technical Brownfields programs have worked together, along with a responsible party and a village mayor, to revitalize a former industrial facility into a property that can be of beneficial use for Ohio’s citizens. The facility was a metal file and rasp manufacturing business for over 150 years until it closed in 2007 and was a major employer for village residents.

Historical manufacturing operations resulted in releases of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), specifically 1,1,1-Trichloroethane (1,1,1-TCA) to groundwater and releases of metals to soil. Remediation activities began in the late 1980s and have continued for over 30 years.

Ohio EPA’s Southeast District Office and Central Office DERR have been working with Simonds to finalize site wide RCRA Corrective Actions, as well as the conditions of the existing DFFOs so that the new property owner (Village of Newcomerstown) can pursue revitalizing the site through the Ohio Voluntary Action Program (VAP). Additionally, Ohio EPA’s Targeted Brownfield Assessment (TBA) program staff and funding are being used to assist the Village in further assessing the site to determine what other areas may need to be cleaned up through the VAP. Major improvements have been occurring on site with monitoring well closures, contaminated soil removal, and 24 of the 26 existing buildings have been demolished within the past few years.

Chem-Dyne (SWDO)

County: Butler
Circa: 1980 – 2015

The Chem-Dyne site was used for the processing and storage of chemical wastes including waste oils, plastics, and resins in the 1970s. More than 30,000 drums of waste and 300,000 gallons of bulk waste materials were left on site when operations ended in 1980. Several environmental incidents were reported at the site including fish kills in the Great Miami River and onsite fires from 1976 to 1979. Site operations resulted in the contamination of soils and groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

The cleanup activities at the Chem-Dyne site began in 1980 and involved stabilization of wastes left behind by the owner when the facility closed. In December of 1981, Chem-Dyne was designated as the State of Ohio's top priority Superfund site. On September 8, 1983, the site was officially added to the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL). U.S. EPA, with Ohio EPA concurrence, issued the Record of Decision for the site on July 5, 1985 which memorialized the selected cleanup remedy. From 1987 through 2005, approximately 35,000 pounds of VOCs were removed from ground water through pump and treatment. From 2009-2011, soil vapor extraction enhancements were applied in an attempt to address finer-grained source materials.In early June 2015, active remediation was discontinued and a “natural attenuation” pilot study was initiated which continues today.

Partnerships

  • Hamilton to New Baltimore Groundwater Consortium
  • City of Hamilton
  • U.S. EPA
  • Chemdyne Trust

Fernald decommissioning and natural resources restoration (SWDO)

County: Hamilton, Butler counties
Circa: 1988-present

Formerly known as the Feed Materials Production Center, the 1050-acre Department of Energy (DOE) site located in Southwest Ohio, was a uranium foundry. The uranium processing facility produced high-purity uranium metal products to support the nation’s defense programs. Construction started in 1951 and operations ceased in 1989. The $4.4 billion cleanup of the Fernald site was one of the largest completed in United States history. The cleanup of the site was a collaboration between local, state and federal governments along with local citizens, which has been highlighted as both a national and international example. Cleanup of the site involved shipping high concentrations wastes off-site with larger volume, lower concentration wastes remaining on-site in an engineered disposal facility. Remediation of the groundwater contamination associated with the facility is on-going. The remainder of the property was restored to natural habitats based upon post remediation topography and historical records of native flora. The site was restored as a part of a natural resource damages settlement between the State of Ohio and DOE. In addition to restoration of the site, nearly 5,000 acres of property have been protected through conservation easements under the settlement. A story map is available highlighting the natural resource projects.

Partnerships

  • Dept. of Energy
  • Great Parks of Hamilton County
  • Metroparks of Butler County
  • U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

Peter’s Cartridge Superfund Site/Redevelopment (SWDO)

County: Warren
Circa: 2009-2021

The Peter's Cartridge Superfund site sits along the wooded banks of the Little Miami River just south of Kings Mills. The 71-acre site included a facility used to manufacture ammunition from approximately 1887 to 1944 and was listed on the National Priorities List (NPL) in 2012. The site was cleanup through the Superfund process included removal of 32,000 cubic yards of lead contaminated soils. After completion of the cleanup in 2016, Ohio EPA worked with a local developer who had interest in purchasing a portion of the property and creating a mixed-use residential and commercial development. In coordination with U.S. EPA, a 14.29-acre portion of the property was delisted, and the developers took part of the property through the Voluntary Action Program (VAP) Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) Track and received a Covenant Not to Sue in 2021. The Agency continues to provide oversight of operation and maintenance activities on the Superfund site and the VAP property is now home to the Cartridge Brewing restaurant and brewery and multifamily residential apartments.

Dayton/TechTown (SWDO)

County: Montgomery
Circa:2010s-present

Over the past two decades, the Agency has worked with the city of Dayton and their development partners to transform brownfields in the Webster Street area just east of downtown and near the confluence of the Great Miami and Mad Rivers into a thriving mixed-use area anchored by the Dayton Dragons Minor League Ballpark with residential housing, bars, restaurants, breweries, and commercial businesses. Dayton used Clean Ohio Fund grants to investigate and clean-up the Former GM Delphi Harrison Radiator/TechTown property and Monument Avenue Gateway properties through the Voluntary Action Program (VAP). Additional properties addressed through the VAP include the Delco Lofts and the Former GHR Foundry. The Ohio EPA issued a Covenant Not to Sue for many of these properties facilitating the redevelopment and area-wide transformation we see today. The Agency continues to work with the city of Dayton to ensure that remnant contamination from the Former GM Delphi Harrison Radiator/TechTown property does not pose a risk to the surrounding residential and commercial properties.

Division of Materials and Waste Management (DMWM)

Top Accomplishments

Development of State Solid Waste Management Districts and the State Solid Waste Management Plan

In 1988, House Bill 592 laid the groundwork for solid waste planning, including a requirement for a State Solid Waste Management Plan and local plans adopted by Ohio’s 52 solid waste management districts. Due to the efforts of many stakeholders, Ohio now has a strong residential recycling infrastructure consisting of an estimated 743 curbside recycling services and more than 1,400 drop-off locations. Further, Ohio recovered 27.9 percent of its municipal solid waste in 2021, exceeding the state’s goal of 25 percent.

Financial Assurance – over 350 facilities with over $1 billion in coverage

Ohio EPA manages over $1 billion in financial assurance for over 350 solid waste facilities across the state. This includes solid waste landfills, transfer facilities, scrap tire facilities, scrap tire transporters, compost facilities, and construction and demolition debris facilities. Financial assurance is provided by licensed facility operators and guarantees that funds are available to pay for closure and post-closure care of the facilities if the owner or operator is unable or unwilling to perform the work. Through financial assurance Ohio EPA safeguards Ohio’s environment near these facilities

Beneficial Use Rules and Program Development

The beneficial use program exists to address the increasing interest in using beneficial use byproducts that are otherwise disposed of in landfills.

Beneficial Use Rules and Program Development

The Division of Materials and Waste Management implements the Beneficial Use Program to promote the diversion of solid and industrial waste from landfill disposal in a manner that is protective of human health and the environment. The program includes various permitting mechanisms to authorize specific waste types and end uses. The most common beneficial use activities are land application for agronomic benefit, soil blending, and structural fill. In calendar year 2021, 446,705 tons of solid and industrial waste were beneficially used.

Scrap Tire Program

Ohio’s Scrap Tire Management Program was established in 1996 and supports an infrastructure of transporters and collection, storage, and recovery facilities for the proper management of scrap tires. In 2021, approximately 11 million scrap tires were recycled, beneficially used, or used in energy recovery.

Construction and Demolition Debris Programs – Rules and Program Development for both disposal facilities and processing facilities

The C&DD Landfill Program was established in 1996 and provides regulation and oversight for the construction, operation, maintenance, closure, and post-closure care of over 50 landfills statewide. Modern-day landfill design includes a recompacted soil liner system, leachate collection system, and groundwater monitoring network. This program ensures the safe disposal of C&DD while protecting public health and the environment.

Construction and Demolition Debris Processing Facility Program

In 2022, Ohio EPA adopted rules that provide a framework for Ohio’s C&DD Processing Facility Program. This program supports the responsible recycling of C&DD and diverts materials from Ohio’s landfills while ensuring processing facilities operate in compliance with applicable environmental regulations.

eBiz DMWM Disposal Fee Report Service

The very first eBiz offering Agency-wide.

Bringing all operating landfills to modern standards

This includes making sure the landfills have proper liners, leachate collection systems, GW monitoring, EG management, closure requirements, financial Assurance, etc.

Creation of the Mosquito Control Grant from the 2016 Scrap Tire Summit

Ohio EPA’s Mosquito Control Grant (MCG) Program is a collaborative effort between Ohio EPA and the Ohio Department of Health (ODH), which began in 2016. The MCG Program was developed to make funding available to entities responsible for implementing mosquito control measures in support of Ohios efforts to reduce the potential for an outbreak of mosquito-borne diseases such as Zika, West Nile, and La Cross Encephalitis. The fundable activities approved under the MCG Program will help reduce the potential for an outbreak of a mosquito-borne virus and simultaneously reduce the threat that scrap tires and scrap tire dumps pose to human health and the environment.

Municipal Solid Waste Landfill Program

The municipal solid waste landfill program provides regulation and oversight for the construction, operation, maintenance, closure, and post-closure care of more than 35 landfills statewide. Modern-day landfill design includes a composite liner and final capping system, explosive gas and groundwater monitoring networks, and leachate collection systems. This program ensures the safe disposal of solid waste while protecting public health and the environment.

Composting Program

Ohio’s Composting Program was established in 1992 and supports the diversion of organic materials, including yard waste and food waste, to more than 300 commercial composting facilities. In 2021, more than 1,235,000 tons of organic wastes destined to landfills were diverted to composting facilities and converted into compost, mulch, and soil blend products.

Infectious Waste Program

Ohio’s Infectious Waste Program was established in 1988 and ensures the proper management of infectious waste. Large generators package sharps and other infectious waste for incineration, autoclave, or other treatment methods.

No-Fault Scrap Tire Cleanup Program

The No-Fault Tire Cleanup Program was established in 1993 and is available to public and private landowners meeting eligibility criteria. The program can provide the removal of up to 10,000 scrap tires at no cost to the property owner. In state fiscal year 2022, this program performed the cleanup of 147,220 scrap tires at 186 sites at a cost of $559, 883.

Site-Specific Work

1388 Stimmel Road – Largest Illegal Dump Clean Up in Franklin County (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 2010s

This 2013 cleanup of a failed construction and demolition debris transfer station was Franklin County’s largest illegal dump. Approximately 225,525 cubic yards of waste were removed and properly disposed. The project was a successful joint effort by Ohio EPA, Central Ohio Contractors, Inc., SWACO, City of Columbus, Franklin County Prosecutors, Franklin County Public Health, Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, and Franklin Township.  Ohio EPA provided a $150,000 cleanup grant and waived MSW/CDD disposal fees.  DMWM received $76,689.64 in 2016 for a portion of re-imbursement from monies collected on the Nuisance Abatement Lien and a court ordered Judgement. The location has been redeveloped and currently houses a U-Haul business.

Fallsburg Road C&DD Landfill – from Subsurface Fire to Pollinator Habitat (CDO)

County: Licking
Circa: 2010s

The Fallsburg Road landfill is a bankrupt Construction and Demolition Debris Landfill that stopped taking waste in 2012 and was improperly closed, resulting in leachate, steam venting and subsidence issues by 2014. Ohio EPA worked to fund and implement site stabilization measures, which included stormwater controls, the containment of uncontrolled leachate, and cap installation to address stormwater infiltration through the cap, at a cost of approximately $3.3 million. Rather than planting traditional grasses to prevent cap erosion, DMWM pioneered the use of a pollinator seed mix for ecological habitat on the 26-acre cap. The landfill is now stabilized enough to conclude post closure care.

Arco Clean-up (NEDO)

County: Cuyahoga
Circa: 2017

The Arco Recycling Plant in East Cleveland was cited for operating an illegal waste landfill. The debris pile caught fire and smoldered for several days before the flames were fully extinguished. DMWM partnered with the Cuyahoga County Board of Health to pay for the removal of 361,073 cubic yards equaling more than 150,000 tons of debris.

Countywide Landfill (NEDO)

County: Stark
Circa: 2006

In 2006, Ohio EPA ordered Republic Services of Ohio II, LLC, to take immediate steps to control odors emanating from the Countywide landfill. Ohio EPA determined that aluminum production wastes disposed of at Countywide were reacting with liquids inside the landfill, resulting in a sub-surface, smoldering fire, which is a violation of Ohio’s solid waste regulations. In March of 2007, Ohio EPA issued orders requiring specific actions to control both the odors and the subsurface reaction/fire.

Wastetran Cleanup (NEDO)

County: Cuyahoga
Circa: 2021

A C&DD recycling company located in Cleveland had been in violation for open dumping and illegal disposal for years. After working with the Attorney General’s Office and taking several trips to court, the facility was finally cleaned up and returned to compliance on November 9, 2021. A total of approximately 19,000 cubic yards of solid waste and construction & demolition debris was removed from the site and transported to licensed/permitted disposal facilities.

Central Waste Closure (NEDO)

County: Mahoning
Circa: 2018-present

The Division of Materials and Waste Management oversaw the closure of the abandoned Central Waste 46-acre municipal solid waste landfill located in Mahoning County. The landfill ceased waste acceptance in 2012 and was abandoned when the owners became bankrupt. The closure project included final capping, leachate management, and explosive gas management at the cost of $4,329,375, which was funded by a financial bond established by the new facility owners. The work was completed by a locally owned business and Ohio EPA’s contractor certified closure on February 22, 2022. The Division will oversee post-closure care of this landfill, including gas monitoring, leachate removal, and cap maintenance.

McMaster & Gollan Tire Cleanup (NEDO)

County: Portage
Circa: 2005

In 2005, the Division of Materials and Waste Management’s contractor removed over one million scrap tires from a legacy tire dump site in Portage County. This tire cleanup presented unique challenges as a majority of the tires were floating in a deep strip cut pit.

A&L Salvage C&DD Landfill (NEDO)

County: Columbiana
Circa: 2011

In 2011, the Division of Materials and Waste Management’s contractor performed closure at the A&L salvage C&DD Landfill after the owner failed to operate in compliance with the C&DD regulations. The closure activities includes installation of a gas and leachate collection system and final capping with a high density polyethylene (HDPE) cap. The owner was required to conduct 5 years of post closure care monitoring and post financial assurance.

Portage Landfill

County: Portage
Circa: 2013

In 2013, the Division of Materials and Waste Management’s contractor performed capping activities at the orphaned Portage Landfill after the owner had failed to properly close the landfill. Ohio EPA had negotiated access to 100,000 cubic yards of soil for capping the landfill from an adjacent farm field. This reduced closure costs to approximately $1 million.

Harvard Landfill

County: Cuyahoga
Circa 2016

Beginning in 2016, the Division of Materials and Waste Management’s contractor installed active gas extraction systems on the north and south portions of the Harvard Landfill. Ohio EPA continues to monitor and maintain the gas extraction systems to prevent landfill gas being a danger to the adjacent densely populated neighborhoods.

Kirby Tire Fire (NWDO)

County: Wyandot
Circa: 2002

A fire started at the Kirby Tire Recycling facility in Wyandot County on Aug. 21, 1999. An estimated 7 million tires burned for 5 days. Over 50 Ohio EPA staff reported to the fire alongside multiple fire response units. Over 20 million tires were estimated to be on site at the time of the fire. Funds from Ohio EPA’s newly created Scrap Tire Management Fund were used to help clean up this site. This fire led Ohio to develop improved scrap tire rules.

Open Burning (SEDO)

County: Southeast Ohio
Circa: 1970s – present

In 1972 most people in Southeast Ohio burned their waste in burn barrels behind their homes, the rest sent their trash to one of the 121 unlined Landfills spread around Southeast Ohio. Now most people have their trash hauled to one of our 10 heavily engineered lined landfills.

Crossridge Tire Cleanup (SEDO)

County: Jefferson
Circa: 2016

In 2016, the Division of Materials and Waste Management’s contractor removed an estimated 1.1 million tires illegally dumped at the Crossridge Site in Jefferson County. This cleanup took 48 days to complete and cost of $1,994,246.53. A lien for this amount was subsequently placed on the property for costs of the removal.

James Bros., Inc. (SEDO)

County: Muskingum
Circa: 2015

In 2015, the Division of Materials and Waste Management’s contractor removed scrap tires illegally dumped in Muskingum County by James Bros. Inc. This cleanup removed 212,431 scrap tires at a cost of $568,701.30. To address the scrap tire dumping and other violations of Ohio’s environmental laws, the Attorney General’s office placed a judgement lien on the property for $1,000,000.00.

Closing 691 Landfill (SEDO)

County: Athens
Circa: 1998

After more than a decade of negotiation with the Athens County Commissioners 691 Landfill was properly closed in 1998. The landfill is now soil capped and an onsite wetland system was constructed to treat landfill leachate. As a result, the site is well-maintained, properly monitored, and does not posed a threat to human health, safety, or the environment.

Closing Jackson County Landfill (SEDO)

County: Jackson
Circa: 1987-2017

Stopped taking waste in 1987 and did not cap the landfill at the time of closure. The landfill remained uncapped leaking millions of gallons of leachate into Salt Lick Creek which flows through Lake Katharine Nature preserve in Jackson County, until Goodyear and Ohio EPA closed the site in 2017.

Burnside/Freedom Recycling & Recovery (SWDO)

County: Logan
Circa: 2016

In 2016, the Division of Materials and Waste Management’s contractor removed scrap tires illegally dumped in Logan County by Randall L. Middaugh operating as Freedom Recycling & Recovery. This cleanup removed 117,201 scrap tires at a cost of $299,172.40. A lien for this amount was subsequently placed on the property for costs of the removal.

Rumpke Sanitary Landfill slide (SWDO)

County: Hamilton
Circa: 1996

On March 9, 1996, a landslide occurred at Rumpke Sanitary Landfill, Ohio's largest landfill.  In the days preceding the slide, cracks had been observed on the northwest side of the waste disposal working face. Those cracks were the precursor to 20 acres of solid waste sliding into an 11-acre area that had been excavated at the toe of the waste slope. The slide exposed approximately 1.5 million cubic yards of solid waste which led to odors, fires, leachate and the creation of Ohio EPA’s first Geotechnical Resource Group (GeoRG) as well as one of the first and most comprehensive geotechnical and slope stability evaluation manuals in the country.  A group of Ohio EPA Solid Waste and Hazardous Waste engineers with the advice and assistance of multiple academic researchers addressed this need within the agency and became GeoRG. The GeoRG Manual is frequently cited and utilized by engineers, designers, consultants and other regulatory agencies. Since the application of the lessons learned from the 1996 event and the implementation of GeoRG Manual, Ohio has not experienced a comparable situation at a regulated landfill.

Division of Surface Water (DSW)

Top Accomplishments

Dam Removals Across the State

The construction of a dam is one of the most serious impacts that a river system can be subjected to effectively converting the river ecosystem to a lake ecosystem. Dams of any size impede the upstream migration of fish, freshwater mussels and other aquatic species, lower water quality by reducing flow and oxygenation levels, allow for the accumulation of sediments within the dam pool and degrade in-stream habitat. All these impacts ultimately lower the fish, macroinvertebrate, and freshwater mussel diversity within the impounded area. In most cases desirable river fish species such as smallmouth bass, may exist in greatly reduced numbers or not at all and are replaced by less desirable pollution tolerant fish species such as carp. Removal of these structures dramatically improves water quality and stream biological diversity in the previously existing dam pools, restores normal flow regimes and restores in-stream habitat. Low head dams also create significant safety hazards to paddlers and other recreational river users. During high flows, low head dams may be barely visible to paddlers from the water’s surface, yet they may cause a paddler to flip and become entrapped in the hydraulic recirculating currents created below the structures. Removal of these structures also greatly increases paddler safety. Ohio EPA has assisted in the funding of many dam removals across the state.

Big Rivers Success

Water quality in Ohio rivers is better now than ever before our lifetime. Between 1981-2010, many of Ohio’s big rivers went from poor quality to good.

Biological Sampling

Ohio EPA has been gathering information on fish and macroinvertebrate (bug) communities from rivers and streams throughout the state since the late 1970s in an effort to fulfill the Clean Water Act’s objective of restoring and maintaining the chemical, physical, and biological integrity of the nation’s waters. Aquatic animals are generally the most sensitive indicators of pollution because they inhabit the water all the time. A healthy stream community is also associated with high quality recreational opportunities (for example, fishing and boating). Stream assessments are based on the experience gained through the collection of more than 28,000 fish population samples and nearly 14,500 aquatic insect community samples.

In addition to biological data, Ohio EPA collects information on the chemical quality of the water (nearly 250,000 water chemistry samples), sediment and wastewater discharges; data on the contaminants in fish flesh; and physical habitat information about streams. Taken together, this information identifies the factors that limit the health of aquatic life and that constitute threats to human health.

Biocriteria

Biocriteria are numeric values that measure the health of fish and macroinvertebrate communities and their responses to various physical, chemical, and biological influences on the aquatic environment. Biocriteria were developed for Ohio rivers and streams using a set of more than 400 reference sites from across the state representative of the least-impacted areas within each of Ohio’s five ecoregions. The values were adopted into Ohio’s water quality standards rules in 1990.

Household Sewage Treatment Systems

The NPDES General Permit for Household Sewage Treatment Systems was first issued in 2007. Since 2007, there are 22,000 homes with active permits under the NPDES General Permits. The Division of Surface Water permits roughly 2000 new household sewage treatment systems a year.

Operator Certification

The Ohio EPA has roughly 4700 licensed wastewater operators who work to keep Ohio’s wastewater treatment system operational. The Operators help maintain and operate roughly 2500 wastewater treatment systems in the State of Ohio.

Biosolids

Ohio EPA received delegation from U.S. EPA to administer the Sewage Sludge Management Program on March 16, 2005. This program regulates the disposal and/or beneficial use of sewage sludge and biosolids generated by over 2,000 wastewater treatment plants in Ohio. Ohio is one of only 9 states that have received permitting authority for biosolids and sewage sludge management.

Antidegradation

A key concept of the Clean Water Act is to restore and maintain the Nation’s waters. Maintaining the existing water quality of healthy streams is supported through a water quality standard referred to as antidegradation. Streams where the water quality exceeds levels necessary to support a healthy ecosystem and safe recreation, antidegradation protects that quality unless Ohio EPA determines that allowing lower water quality is necessary to accommodate important economic or social development in the area in which the waters are located. The lower water quality must be sufficient to protect existing uses fully. Ohio first adopted an antidegradation water quality standard in 1978 and further refined it in 2004.

Return of the Bigeye Chub

At a national scale, habitat loss ranks among the leading causes of extinction and the decline of numerous freshwater species. Over the past 40 years, Ohio EPA has similarly identified deficit habitat among the leading causes of surface water impairment. Sedimentation is perhaps the most consequential form of habitat degradation. Through the concerted efforts of federal, state, and local agricultural agencies, the implementation of modern soil conservation practices began in earnest during the late-1980s.

Perhaps no single species reflects the positive effects of soil conservation on Ohio farmland more than the Bigeye Chub. Before 1940, this species was abundant and broadly distributed throughout Ohio. Subsequent investigations over the following 50 years documented a steady decline, and by 1980 this species was fully eradicated from northwest Ohio and reduced to a literal handful of localities within the remainder of the state.

The exacting life history of the Bigeye Chub made it acutely sensitive to sedimentation, and its decline correlated with increased soil erosion and subsequent sedimentation. Fish inventories conducted as part of Ohio’s long-term basin monitoring program began to capture bigeye chub well outside of the scattered, known locations. Subsequent surveys over the following 20 years continued to document the expansion of Bigeye Chub into its former range, with the frequency and number increasing every few years. Presently, this species is now regularly encountered throughout much of the Ohio. The recovery of the Bigeye Chub is still unfolding, as this formerly imperiled species continues to reclaim waters once lost to sedimentation.

Site-Specific Work

Honda Complex (CDO)

County: Union to start, now Logan, Shelby
Circa: 1970s - present

Permitting the original Honda plants and their expansion in Ohio over five decades:  When Honda came to Ohio starting with the Motorcycle Plant in 1979 and the Marysville Auto Plant shortly after (1982), it was declared the largest economic development project in Ohio at the time.  Since then, Ohio EPA has expeditiously processed numerous air and water permits to help them update and expand their automobile manufacturing operations, most recently with the new Performance Manufacturing Center, completed in 2012, that manufactures the NSX super car.  There may also be some tie-in to the future with Intel being the largest economic development project in Ohio now and air and water permitting are integral.

Newark Processing (CDO)

County: Licking
Circa: 1990s – 2000s

Newark Processing was a secondary aluminum recycling facility in Licking County, adjacent to the Licking River, and operated from 1980 until they declared bankruptcy in1996.  Ohio EPA issued director’s final findings and orders to Newark Processing in 1988 for surface water violations, which they complied with until they ceased operation in 1996. The bankruptcy court awarded Ohio EPA approximately $300,000 in 2002.  In 2004 Ohio EPA observed the stockpiled waste material eroding rather dramatically into the Licking River.  The Ohio EPA approached the United States Army Corp of Engineers (USACE) in 2005 for assistance due to their expertise in constructing stream bank stabilization projects, and was able to provide USACE with $2.8 million from the hazardous waste cleanup fund that allowed them to undertake the riverbank stabilization project.

American Ditch (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 2010s

American Ditch is located in Columbus, north of the American Addition neighborhood. The sediment in American Ditch was contaminated with cadmium and zinc runoff from the former ASARCO property.  Using money from the ASARCO bankruptcy settlement, in 2017 Ohio EPA assessed and contracted out the cleanup of a 500-foot section of American Ditch. A total of 245 tons of contaminated sediment were removed and properly disposed.  In addition, 47 tons of solid waste, 5 tons of tires, and 8 cubic yards of transite, an asbestos containing material, were removed from the ditch and nearby.  The clean-up of the ditch removed contaminated sediment and waste from a historically underserved neighborhood in Columbus.

Olentangy River Dam Removals

County: Delaware
Circa: 2005-2008

Removal of several dams along the Olentangy, including the River Street dam (2005) and the Central Avenue Dam (2008) in Delaware county, has resulted in improved habitat conditions for both macroinvertebrate and fish communities. These projects were funded in part through Ohio’s Nonpoint Source Pollution Control Program sub-awards and were implemented consistent with recommendations that are included in the state-endorsed Upper Olentangy River watershed action plan and Ohio EPA’s Olentangy River TMDL study that was completed and approved by U.S. EPA in September 2007. The aquatic communities reflect the improved habitat conditions with significant increases in species/taxa richness and the associated biological community index scores (Tables 2 and 4). Habitat scores should continue to improve as the free-flowing habitat conditions evolve and stabilize within the previously impounded reaches. With removal of the two dams, full WWH aquatic life use attainment has been realized and the impairment of 0.8 mile within the two former impoundments has been eliminated. https://epa.ohio.gov/static/Portals/35/documents/OlentangyDelawareDamRemovals2009.pdf

Scotts Landfill (CDO)

County: Union
Circa: 1990s

DERR sampling in the mid 90’s detected numerous problematic pollutants in the grounds surrounding the Scotts manufacturing facility near Marysville. Surface water sampling confirmed loss of these compounds to waters of the state. Scotts consolidated these materials into more secure landfills and conducted stream restoration work resulting in greatly

Scioto River Water Quality Improvements (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 1970s - present

When Ohio EPA started monitoring the Scioto River below Columbus the River was extremely degraded from inadequate wastewater treatment. In 1979 the median Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI; fish health) score was below 20. Ohio EPA identified and sought solutions to the wastewater treatment problems, and by 2015 conditions had improved so much that the median IBI rose 46, which attains Exceptional Warm Water Habitat goals. This improvement was based mostly on improvements to wastewater treatment completed by the City of Columbus, in response to Ohio EPA.

Big Darby Creek TMDL/Restoration (CDO)

County: Union, Madison, Franklin, Champaign, Logan, Pickaway
Circa: 1970s - present

In the early 2000s a comprehensive survey of the Big Darby Creek watershed was conducted, resulting in the 2006 TMDL report. Big Darby Creek is designated as Exceptional Warmwater Habitat and Outstanding Water in our Water Quality Standards. The report identified areas of impairment and needed loading reductions. By 2014 most of the impairments had been eliminated. CDO led public participation efforts, sampled, and assisted with report writing for this project.

Columbus Wet Weather Management Plan/Blueprint Columbus (CDO)

County: Franklin
Circa: 2000s-present

In the early 2000s Ohio EPA signed two consent orders with the city of Columbus, one dealing with overflows from the sanitary sewer system, the other with overflows from the combined sewer system. These kicked off decades of sewer improvements aimed at reducing the overflows. In the mid 2010’s, storm water green infrastructure was added to the plan and it morphed to an integrated plan. Columbus actively working on green infrastructure projects in multiple areas of the city with plans for installation looking as far forward as the 2030s. CDO inspected, followed up on, and assisted in many of the projects.

Cuyahoga River Restoration (NEDO)

County: Northeast Ohio
Circa: 1972-present

The environmental movement, and Ohio EPA’s existence, got started in part by the burning of the Cuyahoga River in 1969. Over the last 50 years, Ohio EPA has worked with federal, state, and local partners to restore the Cuyahoga River. In 2019, the beneficial use impairment for restrictions on fish consumption was removed. Today, the health of the river has greatly improved since it last burned in 1969.

Ashtabula River Cleanup and Restoration (NEDO)

County: Northeast Ohio
Circa: 1980s-present

For the past 30 years, time, resources and significant investments of money have been dedicated towards addressing the sources of impairment and their recovery in the Ashtabula River. The investment of nearly $70 million in public and private funding was utilized to remediate and restore the lower river. The work resulted in the removal of 700,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment, including over 14,000 pounds of PCBs and other contaminants, and creation of 3,840 feet of new aquatic habitat in the lower Ashtabula River. The most significant environmentally degraded conditions have now been addressed, which has already resulted in economic revitalization and increased recreational uses of the Ashtabula River. The Ashtabula River was removed from the Bi-National Area of Concern list in August 2021.

Mahoning River Restoration (NEDO)

County: Northeast Ohio
Circa:1994-present

Ohio EPA is working with our state and local partners to help restore the Mahoning River. Since 2020, two of the nine low head dams on the lower Mahoning River located in Struthers and Lowellville, have been removed opening the stretch of water to a free flowing river. Ohio EPA has seen measurable improvement to the river since our first survey in 1994. In 1994, 83% of the survey areas did not meet Ohio’s water quality standard. In 2013, Ohio EPA’s last survey of the river, only 8% of the survey area did not meet our standards – a dramatic improvement.

Butler Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility (NWDO)

County: Richland
Circa: 2021

One of Ohio’s first wastewater regionalization projects, the Butler Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility eliminated four non-compliant treatment systems (Village of Bellville, the Village of Butler, Clear Fork Mobile Home Park, and Clear Fork Schools). Through the encouragement, facilitation, and funding from Ohio EPA, Ohio Public Works Commission and Community Development Block Grants, this project addressed significant pollution in the Clear Fork of the Mohican River The new plant became operational in the spring of 2021.

Ottawa River (NWDO)

County: Northwest Ohio
Circa:1990s-present

Since the 1990s, dozens of Ohio EPA staff have worked to address contamination in a seven mile stretch of the Ottawa River in Toledo. Pollution sources along the river included several landfills, industrial facilities and eight sewer outlets. These contamination sources were stopped or contained. Ohio EPA staff collected hundreds of samples in the river of sediment, water, fish, turtles and bugs and samples on 21 properties along the river. Severe biological damage & significant contamination in sediment & water were found. Tumors on fish were visible. Over 260,000 cubic yards of contaminated sediment were removed from the river in 2010. Additionally damages to the river and wildlife were addressed through penalties and required habitat projects. Today the river has recovered remarkably. This progress happened with the cooperation of businesses, the City of Toledo and U.S. EPA. Today, fish can safely be eaten from the river.

Clean Your Streams (NWDO)

County: Northwest Ohio
Circa: 2004-present

Since 2004, Ohio EPA staff have participated in an annual Clean Your Streams event in Toledo, Ohio. Event volunteers remove litter and debris from local waterways. CYS has grown from just a few small clean ups on a couple streams to over a thousand people and more than 10 tons of trash collected in a single day. Ohio EPA’s, Cherie Blair, helped organize the first event in 1997 when she was employed by the Ohio Lake Erie Commission. The event is now organized by Partners for Clean Streams, a local non-profit.

CSO improvements in Maumee basin (NWDO)

County: Northwest Ohio
Circa: 2007-present

In the Maumee River watershed, over the last 15 years, combined sewer overflows (CSOs) during heavy rainfalls have been reduced by roughly 1 billion gallons per year, preventing water pollution. The costs to make this progress was slightly over $1 Billion dollars.

Raccoon Creek (SEDO)

County: Southeast Ohio
Circa: 1980s- present

The upper section of Raccoon Creek is designated limited resource water (LRW) due to acid mine drainage (AMD) but numerous coal mining reclamation projects in the headwaters has dramatically improved the biological community. In 1995, the average biological community scores ranged from very poor to fair and fell below warm water habitat (WWF) expectations. In 2016, the average scores improved into the good to very good range within WWH expectations. Similar improvements occurred in the middle section of Raccoon Creek with average scores ranging from fair to good in 1995 and improving in the good to exceptional range. The lower section of Racoon Creek also improved as well ranging from good to very good in 1995 to exceptional in 2016. As a result of these improvements, the upper and middle section of Raccoon Creek are recommended WWH aquatic life use (ALU) and the lower section below the Vinton dam is recommended exceptional warmwater habitat (EWH) ALU.

The Raccoon Creek Partnership (RCP) is a member based nonprofit organization formed in 2007 to improve and protect the water quality in the Raccoon Creek watershed. RCP (and former iterations of the watershed group which began in the 1980s) have completed 19 projects to treat mine drainage in the upper and middle section of the watershed. RCP continues to maintain and monitor active mine drainage treatment systems and recently removed a low head dam in Big Sandy Run improving the habitat and allowing fish passage to upstream habitats. https://epa.ohio.gov/static/Portals/35/tmdl/TSD/Raccoon Creek/2016_RaccoonCreek_TSD.pdf

Nelsonville Wastewater Treatment Plant (SEDO)

County: Athens
Circa: 2018- present

Ohio EPA funding to Nelsonville will be used to build a wastewater treatment plant and install additional collection lines. The plant will serve as the central hub of a new regional treatment area that includes portions of Athens and Hocking Counties. The investment also will help the city purchase and improve the village of Buchtel's wastewater treatment system, reducing user fees. Additionally, Nelsonville has entered into an agreement with Hocking County to treat waste from unsewered areas in nearby Murray City and Carbon Hill. State funding will offset the cost of these additional collection systems. The project area is located at the gateway of Wayne National Forest, an important Appalachian recreation and rural tourism center. Construction and upgrades will positively impact the health of more than 6,630 rural Ohio residents.

Unsewered Southeast Ohio Communities (SEDO)

County: Southeast Ohio
Circa: 2000s-present

Over the past 20 Years, Ohio EPA has had 20 unsewered villages in southeast Ohio install sewer systems, preventing pollution and contamination.

Marietta Coal Co. – Resolution of mitigation obligations for the Triple B mine site (SEDO)

County: Belmont
Circa: 2003-2022

On Aug. 12, 2003, a 401 WQC was issued for the Triple B Mine project to Marietta Coal Company. The 401 WQC permitted impacts to 11,115 linear feet of seven intermittent and ephemeral stream segments. After mining and stream reconstruction, Ohio EPA determined the site was only partially meeting the mitigation requirements of the 401 WQC. There were 2,229.5 linear feet (or credits) of mitigation that still need to be fulfilled. Ohio EPA, Marietta and the Ohio Department of Natural Resources, Division of Mineral Resource Management (ODNR-DMRM) coordinated on an Abandoned Mineland Reclamation Program (AML) project to fully resolve Respondent’s outstanding mitigation requirement. Marietta agreed to fully fund the project.

ODNR-DMRM developed the Dry Fork Stream Capture Project (Dry Fork Project) in the Dry Fork – Short Creek. The project resulted in the filling of a vertical shaft, construction of a new stream channel within the approximate old channel boundary and reestablishing a connection of the tributary with Dry Fork. Completion of the project resulted in elimination of a Priority 1 Vertical Opening and a Priority 3 Environmental AML problem. It reestablished the connection of 1,500 linear feet of headwater tributary to Dry Fork.

Restoration of the Upper Little Miami River (SWDO)

County: Southwest Ohio
Circa: 1998-present

When the upper Little Miami River (National Scenic River) was sampled in 1998, about 2/3 of the main stem was impaired, mostly due to nutrient enrichment.  As a result, Ohio EPA completed a TMDL, approved by U.S. EPA in 2002, which recommended a reduction in phosphorus loadings within the watershed.  As a result, many communities along the upper Little Miami River invested millions of dollars in nutrient removal infrastructure at their wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). When Ohio EPA returned to sample the watershed in 2011, total phosphorus concentrations were significantly lower compared to 1998, and the entire main stem downstream of the WWTPs was in full attainment of the biological criteria. Efforts put forward by numerous Ohio EPA staff, state partners and local communities helped achieve measurable water quality gains in the Little Miami River; a waterbody utilized by thousands of recreators each year for fishing, canoeing, and swimming.

Lick Run Waterway Restoration (SWDO)

County: Hamilton
Circa: 2013- 2021

100 years ago in Cincinnati, a waterway called Lick Run was buried in an 18-foot diameter combined sewer pipe to carry all storm water and sanitary sewage through Lick Run Valley.  As a result, the Lick Run Combined Sewer Overflow (CSOs) ended up being one of the highest volume wet weather discharges east of the Mississippi River. Compelled by a Federal Joint Consent Decree to provide volumetric control at CSOs, the Metropolitan Sewer District of Greater Cincinnati, in conjunction with Hamilton County Commissioners, selected green infrastructure to provide the desired overflow reduction. 

This remedy, known as the Lick Run Greenway, removed the waterway Lick Run from the combined sewer system to return its natural flow to the Mill Creek.  This nationally recognized, multi-million-dollar project incorporated green infrastructure bioswales, bioretention areas, enhanced natural waterways feeding Lick Run, and included public amenities for the local community to enjoy this recently restored, historic area of Cincinnati.

AK Steel/Dick’s Creek Cleanup (SWDO)

County: Butler, Warren counties
Circa: 2006-2013

The Cleveland Cliffs Middletown Works facility covers almost 2,600 acres and is involved in various aspects of iron and steel manufacturing and processing. Parts of the facility have been in operation since 1901. The removal of PCBs from Dicks Creek and Monroe Ditch, as well as the subsequent restoration of the streams were required in the 2006 Consent Decree order. A fishing advisory was placed on the stream until the cleanup and restoration could be completed. During the cleanup and restoration, 193,000 tons of PCB contaminated soil and sediment were removed, 18,000 trees were planted, 3.2 miles of stream were cleaned up. The fish advisory was lifted after a successful clean up, and the stream plant and animal communities improved.

2019 Dayton Tornados (SWDO)

County: Montgomery, surrounding area
Circa: 2019

On May 27, 2019, 15 tornados hit the Greater Dayton region. Because of the significant damages sustained from this weather outbreak, Ohio EPA’s Southwest District Office staff were heavily engaged, around the clock, in response and with assistance activities. Ohio EPA staff contacted all drinking water and wastewater plants in the affected areas to assess operations and link them with resources to aid in restoration of services in an expeditious manner. Ohio EPA also provided around the clock assistance to both Dayton and Montgomery County as Dayton was trying to restore water service while power was out, and one water plant was heavily damaged. In addition, Ohio EPA coordinated with local health departments, county officials and the waste service industry to help with waste and debris management. Ohio EPA was very proud to be a part of the efforts in helping these communities in wake of such disasters.

Office of Environmental Education

Top Accomplishments

  • Ohio’s share of the Volkswagen settlement totaled $75 million to reduce emissions around the state. These projects have offset more than 2000 tons a year of nitrogen oxides and other pollutants, to offset the damage done by more than 15,000 vehicles that operated in Ohio with illegal defeat devices that turned off their emission controls. Here is what that funding went to:
    • 411 aging diesel school buses with 58 propane, 6 CNG and 347 new diesel buses.
    • 66 aging diesel transit buses with 16 electric, 1 propane, 22 CNG and 27 new diesel transit buses.
    • 318 aging diesel heavy duty trucks with 1 electric, 49 CNG and 258 new diesel trucks.
    • 22 diesel cranes, cargo handlers and terminal tractors with new all-electric equipment.
    • 20 pieces of diesel airport ground support equipment with new all-electric equipment.
    • 4 diesel switcher locomotives with 4 all-electric switchers.
    • Eight ancient diesel tugboats with four diesel electric hybrid tugs.
    • Install electric vehicle charging stations at 211 locations in 25 counties.
  • Converted $29.6 million in penalties for violations of Ohio’s air and water pollution control laws into 1,270 Ohio Environmental Education Fund grants to educate pre-school to university students and teachers, the general public and the regulated community about ways to prevent pollution and protect the environment.
  • From school land labs in the 1990s to Leave No Child Inside and installing Green Infrastructure at LEED-Certified schools today, OEEF grant projects have evolved with changing technology. Students using topographical maps now augment them with handheld GPS units to delineate watershed boundaries. We still want to get kids outdoors and muddy, but now they are using their computer gizmos like iNaturalist to identify species, and uploading their findings to local, state and national databases. Slide carousels and signs have given way to downloadable videos, interactive exhibits and QR codes. Soil and Water Conservation Districts are using drones and remote sensing data to help farmers optimize fertilizer applications.
  • Awarded more than $1 million in environmental science and engineering scholarships to students at 52 different Ohio colleges and universities.
  • Ohio EPA has funded $9.2 million for School Bus Retrofits.
  • Between 2006 and 2016, Ohio EPA used $9.2 million in state civil penalties and federal grants to install pollution control equipment onto 2,625 model year 1996-2004 school buses, and idle reduction equipment onto another 1,037 buses, to protect the health of children and bus drivers, and remove more than 117 tons of pollutants from Ohio skies.
  • Ohio EPA has funded $2 million for stormwater education.
  • Since 2002, the Ohio Environmental Education Fund has awarded 122 grants for a total of more than $2 million to support these local education efforts. Federal regulations require municipalities to educate their residents about the problems of stormwater management, and how individuals can help reduce pollution levels.
  • Grants for Stream Monitoring  These grants teach residents to identify their local watersheds, to understand how we all contribute to pollution and how we all can help reduce it. Ohio’s Environmental Education Fund grants for stream monitoring projects have taught thousands of students, teachers and citizen volunteers to walk local streams with kick-seine nets, collecting pollution tolerant and pollution intolerant macro-invertebrates as indicators of the health of the biotic community. They also test the chemistry of the water column, and learn how physical features such as overhanging trees, riffles, and vegetation on banks improve water quality. The Office of Environmental Education also offers workshops to certify teachers and watershed volunteers as Level 1 Credible Data collectors for educational purposes.
  • Project WET (Water Education Today) — Ohio EPA assumed statewide coordination of Ohio’s Project WET (Water Education Today) national environmental education curriculum in 2014 and shepherded the statewide launch of new teaching resources for early childhood (Getting Little Feet Wet) and climate (Climate, Water and Resilience). With the help from nearly 300 trained facilitators around the state, Ohio EPA has offered workshops providing Project WET materials to 1,559 teachers and other educators, reaching an estimated more than 20,000 students.
  • Diesel Emission Reduction Grants Ohio EPA partnered with the Ohio Department of Transportation between 2010-2022 to offer more than $97 million in Diesel Emission Reduction Grants, using Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality funding from the Federal Highway Administration. The 149 projects installed pollution control equipment like diesel oxidation catalysts and diesel particulate filters onto buses and trucks, repowered the engines of towboats along the Ohio River, installed idle reduction equipment onto locomotives, and in recent years helped replace 154 transit buses with new buses running on diesel, propane, compressed natural gas, electricity, and even hydrogen fuel cells.
  • Ohio EPA supports recycling all kinds of things – even tugboats! The Great Lakes Towing Company received a Diesel Mitigation Trust Fund grant from Ohio EPA for a portion of the cost to replace old diesel tugs with new diesel electric hybrids, to reduce more than 40 tons of air pollution emissions annually.  The old vessels were first placed in service as long ago as 1897, and their engines were last refurbished in the 1950s, well before the Clean Air Act.  These grants require that old diesel engines be destroyed and old vehicles taken out of service as a condition to receive the public funds.  Ohio EPA and U.S. EPA agreed to waive this requirement for the oldest of the old tugboats, so that Tug Ohio is now secured as an exhibit at the National Museum of the Great Lakes in Toledo!
  • Environmental Career Ambassadors More than 480 environmental professionals around the state have volunteered as Environmental Career Ambassadors to show students the wide variety of careers available in both the public and private sectors. The Ambassadors reached more than 167,000 students through classroom and career day presentations between 2015-2022. They also provided 883 internships, one-on-one mentoring to 222 students, and 51 shadowing opportunities for high school students to observe professionals in action. When in-person presentations weren’t possible during the pandemic, the ambassadors posted video career chats. The program results from a three-way partnership between the Environmental Education Council of Ohio, Ohio EPA, and the Ohio State University Environmental Professionals Network. Other program resources include an environmental career bingo game, and a series of career pathways showing high school and early college coursework needed to pursue different environmental jobs and salaries.

Office of Emergency Response

Site-Specific Work

Ohio EPA’s emergency responders are called upon to provide oversight and resources in emergency situations. OER staff helps investigate spills and releases that are difficult to locate.  OER staff provides valuable knowledge to guide response to releases of pollutants to the environment. Their experience and knowledge help to minimize the impact of these releases to the public and our environment. 
OER Site Specific Work

Wellington Pipeline Release

County: Lorain
Circa: 2012

The Wellington Pipeline Release involved the release of approximately 123,000 gallons of gasoline from a break in a high pressure, underground pipeline. The gasoline inundated a waterway for over 1.25 miles and covered approx. 1.5 acres with gasoline. Rapid actions by local first responders established temporary containment within the waterway to prevent the gasoline from reaching the Black River, a tributary of Lake Erie. The company sponsored cleanup lasted over the course of 2 months and utilized a multi-division support from Ohio EPA to manage the cleanup, monitor water quality and coordinate the temporary storage, characterization and disposal of both solid and hazardous waste streams.

Rover Release

County: Stark, Tuscarawas counties
Circa: 2017

During the horizontal directional drilling operation for the installation of a 42” diameter natural gas pipeline under the Tuscarawas River, a surface breakout of drilling fluids occurred in a remote, high quality, wetland area. The remote location of the breakout attributed to the delayed discovery of the release and resulted in a 3 - 5 million gallons of drilling fluid (primarily bentonite clay-based materials) accumulating up to 24” inches deep across six acres of the wetland. The cleanup required extensive preparation work and lasted for over three months. Cleanup utilized extensive labor effort and equipment to recovery the lost drilling fluids from within the wetland. Ohio EPA’s Division of Surface Water provide wetland advisory support to OER to ensure restoration of the wetland was protective and effective.

Painesville Train Derailment

County: Lake
Circa: 2007

A 30-railcar derailment involving tank cars of hazardous materials, LPG, Methanol and Phthalic Anhydride, being on fire occurred in Painesville, Ohio. The derailment was located on the fringe of a large residential community and a busy state route resulting in temporary evacuations of residents and closure of the highway. Initial response measures were defensive in nature until the following day when the assessment of the threat posed by the hazardous materials was completed and offensive measures could safely be taken. Hazmat teams made multiple entries to conduct damage assessment on the tank cars, identify reporting marks and assess the effectiveness of fire suppression actions. The fires were allowed to burn (as a controlled burn) for the next three days. Ohio EPA worked with the railroad for the containment of the impacted fire suppression runoff, air monitoring and cleanup of the impacted areas which included wetland areas.

Belpre Shell Plant Explosion (SEDO)

County: Washington
Circa: 1994

On May 27, 1994, in Belpre Township, an explosion and resulting fire occurred at the Shell Chemical Plant tank farm involving isoprene, butadiene, cyclohexane, styrene and diesel fuel. Four, 1-million-gallon tanks of styrene and a 400,000-gallon tank of diesel fuel were involved in the fire. An unknown amount of material from the tank farm entered Davis Creek, a tributary of the Ohio River. OER assisted the responsible party and other response partners with coordination of the response, surface water sampling and air sampling for the incident.

Statoil Well Pad fire (SEDO)

County: Monroe
Circa: 2014

On June 28, 2014, in Ohio Township, a fire occurred on the Eisenbarth Well Pad during hydraulic fracturing activities. The fire consumed over 90% of the well pad, damaging the hydraulic fracturing equipment and releasing flow back water onto and off the well pad. The flow back water contained various chemicals, specifically a biocide, that entered a tributary of Opossum Creek, which resulted in a fish kill that was observed for over six miles in the waterway. OER assisted the responsible party and other response partners with coordination of the response, surface water sampling and air sampling for the incident.

XTO Energy Lost Control Well (SEDO)

County: Belmont
Circa: 2018

On February 15, 2018, York in Township, Belmont County – An uncontrolled release of natural gas and resulting fire occurred on the Schnegg Well Pad as the wells were being prepared for production. The lost control incident lasted for 21 days and released an estimated 21 million cubic feet of natural gas into the atmosphere. OER assisted the responsible party and other response partners with coordination of the response, surface water sampling and air sampling for the incident.

Kirby Tire (NWDO)

County: Wyandot
Circa: 2002

A fire started at the Kirby Tire Recycling facility in Wyandot County on August 21, 1999. An estimated 7 million tires burned for 5 days. Over 50 Ohio EPA staff reported to the fire alongside multiple fire response units. Over 20 million tires were estimated to be on site at the time of the fire. Funds from Ohio EPA’s newly created Scrap Tire Management Fund were used to help clean up this site. This fire led Ohio to develop improved scrap tire rules.

Portage River Spill (NWDO)

County: Wood
Circa: 2011

On Feb. 6, 2011, 31 ethanol rail cars derailed, releasing 826,000 gallons of denatured alcohol impacting a tributary to the south branch of the Portage River. Over 58,000 gallons of ethanol was collected from the rail cars, over 990,000 gallons of impacted water was collected from the surrounding waterways.  Ohio EPA’s NWDO Emergency Response staff provided critical assistance to the emergency response teams.

Chem-Dyne (SWDO)

County: Butler
Circa: 1980 – 2015

The Chem-Dyne site was used for the processing and storage of chemical wastes including waste oils, plastics, and resins in the 1970s. More than 30,000 drums of waste and 300,000 gallons of bulk waste materials were left on site when operations ended in 1980. Several environmental incidents were reported at the site including fish kills in the Great Miami River and onsite fires from 1976 to 1979. Site operations resulted in the contamination of soils and groundwater with volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

The cleanup activities at the Chem-Dyne site began in 1980 and involved stabilization of wastes left behind by the owner when the facility closed. In December of 1981, Chem-Dyne was designated as the State of Ohio's top priority Superfund site. On September 8, 1983, the site was officially added to the Superfund National Priorities List (NPL). U.S. EPA, with Ohio EPA concurrence, issued the Record of Decision for the site on July 5, 1985 which memorialized the selected cleanup remedy. From 1987 through 2005, approximately 35,000 pounds of VOCs were removed from ground water through pump and treatment. From 2009-2011, soil vapor extraction enhancements were applied in an attempt to address finer-grained source materials.In early June 2015, active remediation was discontinued and a “natural attenuation” pilot study was initiated which continues today.

Partnerships

  • Hamilton to New Baltimore Groundwater Consortium
  • City of Hamilton
  • U.S. EPA
  • Chemdyne Trust

Miamisburg Train Derailment (SWDO)

County: Montgomery
Circa: 1986

On July 8, 1986, a freight train containing several cars of white phosphorous was on its way to a facility operated by Mobil Mining in Fernald, Ohio. Instead of reaching its destination to be processed into phosphoric acid for the food and beverage industry, the cargo was released to the environment when the train derailed in Miamisburg, Ohio. The pyrophoric phosphorus ignited as soon as it came into contact with the air, causing a gigantic plume of dense smoke to blanket the area. In the largest evacuation in Ohio history, 30,000 residents were relocated from Miamisburg, West Carrollton, and Moraine to neighboring high schools, the University of Dayton, and the Dayton Convention Center. By July 10 everyone but two hundred families who lived closest to the fire were allowed to return to their homes. The Miamisburg Fire Department sprayed the burning train cars with water from 7 tanker trucks continuously for six days until the 12,500 gallons of phosphorous finally burned itself out. Ohio EPA SWDO took phone calls and coordinated emergency actions 24 hours a day while the fires burned. Some staff were interviewed by CNN as the fire gained national attention. In the end, 600 people sought medical attention due to inhalation issues and the rail industry changed how rail cars are coupled, reducing the chance of rupture in derailment accidents.