As a precautionary response to COVID-19, Ohio EPA is currently operating with most staff working remotely. If you are working with our staff on a current project and you know the name of the employee you are working with, email them at firstname.lastname@epa.ohio.gov or call them directly. The Agency website has contact information for every district, division, and office. To report a spill or environmental emergency, contact the spill hotline (800) 282-9378 or (614) 224-0946. This number should only be used for emergencies. For all other calls, please contact Ohio EPA’s main phone line at (614) 644-3020 or the main line for the division or office you are trying to reach.

After March 23, our district offices and Central Office will be temporarily closed and will have increasingly limited ability to receive deliveries, plans, etc. All entities are encouraged to submit plans, permit applications, etc., electronically where there are existing avenues to do so, such as the eBusiness Center (eBiz). Please refer to the list of available services on the main eBiz webpage. We encourage you to make use of all that apply, even if you have not used eBiz in the past. Plans under 25 MB can be emailed. For large plans over 25 MB, entities should work with the reviewer/division to upload via LiquidFiles. Directions for submitting docs via LiquidFiles is available on YouTube. We apologize for the inconvenience and thank you in advance for your understanding. If you wish to send hard copies of documents to any of Ohio EPA’s district offices, the best method to ensure we receive these documents is to send them via U.S. Mail. Since all offices are closed, deliveries outside of U.S. Mail (FedEx, UPS) will likely be returned because the offices are closed and deliveries cannot be made.



8/25/13
PUBLIC INTEREST CENTER: (614) 644-2160
MEDIA CONTACT: Linda Fee Oros

CITIZEN CONTACT: Mary McCarron

Ohio EPA, The Environmental Education Council of Ohio and The Ohio State University Partner to Launch Career Recruiting Network


Ohio high school students will have new opportunities to explore careers in environmental science and engineering, thanks to a three-way partnership between Ohio EPA, the Environmental Education Council of Ohio (EECO) and The Ohio State University School of Environment and Natural Resources.

The three partner organizations will recruit volunteer environmental career ambassadors who will mentor and present information to students or provide opportunities for them to shadow an environmental professional on the job.

Ohio EPA Director Scott Nally said, “The goal is to provide opportunities for students to experience what options are available for a rewarding technological career in Ohio. Connecting students with professionals in these fields is a necessary step to bring all the puzzle pieces together.”

According to Dr. Jeff Sharp, interim director of The Ohio State University School of Environment and Natural Resources, “The School is excited to be a partner in this important effort to connect environmental career ambassadors with students and believes this will impact our efforts to reach a much wider cadre of students interested in careers in natural resources and environment fields.”

The program can make students aware of environmental careers available in fields such as air quality, emergency response, energy, environmental design, forestry, geology, pollution prevention, recycling, soil and water conservation, waste minimization and wildlife management.

The Ohio State University School of Environment and Natural Resources is offering its new online Environmental Professionals Network as the no-cost platform for educators to locate and schedule ambassadors to speak with students. Professionals can register online and check career activities and volunteer opportunities. Options include making classroom presentations, participating in school career fairs, judging science fairs, hosting field trips, providing internships, mentoring students and young professionals, and recruiting professional peers to join.

The ambassadors and educators also will learn about career-oriented student competitions such as the Ohio Envirothon for high school teams and the National Engineers Week Future City Competition for middle school teams. They will be able to access toolkits and tabletop models that demonstrate real-world environmental processes such as drinking water treatment and cleanup of hazardous material spills.

The program has business community support from the Ohio Environmental Service Industries representing waste management firms and the Ohio Chemistry Technology Council representing chemical firms, as well as employers, federal, state and local agencies, universities, park districts and nonprofit organizations. The Ohio Department of Education’s Office of Career-Technical Education is promoting the ambassador program to career counselors, teachers and students.

For more information on how to participate, contact EECO executive director Brenda Metcalf by email or call (740) 653-2649, visit epn.osu.edu to sign up as a volunteer, or at Ohio EPA contact Carolyn Watkins by email, or call (614) 644-2873.

-30-

The Ohio Environmental Protection Agency was created in 1972 to consolidate efforts to protect and improve air quality, water quality and waste management in Ohio. In the past 40 years, air pollutants dropped by as much as 90 percent; large rivers meeting standards improved from 21 percent to 89 percent; and hundreds of polluting, open dumps were replaced with engineered landfills and an increased emphasis on waste reduction and recycling. Ohio EPA….40 years and moving forward.

 
 800-282-9378